Ebola

(redirected from Ebola hemorrhagic fever)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Financial, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
Related to Ebola hemorrhagic fever: Ebola virus

Ebola

(ĭ-bō′lə, ĕb′ō-lä)
n.
1. A filovirus that causes disease in humans and nonhuman primates and spreads through contact with bodily fluids of infected people and animals. Bats are thought to be the host reservoir for the virus. Also called Ebola virus.
2. An acute, usually fatal form of hemorrhagic fever that is caused by this virus and is characterized by fever, headache, muscle pain, vomiting, diarrhea, and bleeding, especially from the mucous membranes and gastrointestinal tract. Also called Ebola disease, Ebola hemorrhagic fever, Ebola virus disease.

Ebola,

river in Zaire, Africa.
Ebola hemorrhagic fever - Synonym(s): Ebola virus
Ebola virus - filovirus discovered in 1976, level 4 pathogen; severity of illness can run from mild to fatal in host. Synonym(s): Ebola hemorrhagic fever
References in periodicals archive ?
An outbreak of Ebola hemorrhagic fever in West Africa has spread to Guinea's capital and beyond its borders in an "unprecedented epidemic," Doctors without Borders reported.
Clinical virology of Ebola hemorrhagic fever (EHF): virus, virus antigen, and IgG and IgM antibody findings among EHF patients in Kikwit, Democratic Republic of the Congo, 1995.
Ebola hemorrhagic fever, Kikwit, Democratic Republic of the Congo, 1995: risk factors for patients without a reported exposure.
OTCBB:AEMD), a pioneer in developing therapeutic devices for infectious disease, announced today that research related to the Aethlon Hemopurifier([R]) as a potential treatment for Ebola Hemorrhagic Fever (EHF) has been initiated at The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).
Tianyuan Bio-pharmaceuticals currently has 4 vaccines in their portfolio covering such diseases as Ebola Hemorrhagic Fever, and Influenza virus vaccine, inactive.
To the Editor: Three well-documented outbreaks of Ebola hemorrhagic fever occurred from 1996 through 2001 in Gabon in central Africa (1).
Ebola hemorrhagic fever - the severe, usually fatal disease that Ebola virus causes in humans and in nonhuman primates - first emerged in 1976 in villages along the Ebola River in the Sudan and the Democratic Republic of the Congo, Africa.
Data are then presented that indicate that a marked die-off of lymphocytes also occurs in Ebola hemorrhagic fever, anthrax, and plague, which suggests that unregulated apoptosis of these cells is a component of many, and perhaps all, severe infectious processes and may contribute to high case fatality rates by impairing adaptive immune function.
The Ebola virus disease, previously known as the Ebola hemorrhagic fever, is a severe illness in humans, often fatal, according to the WHO.
Ebola hemorrhagic fever is a serious, often-fatal disease that affects humans and nonhuman primates.