Ebola


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

Ebola

(ĭ-bō′lə, ĕb′ō-lä)
n.
1. A filovirus that causes disease in humans and nonhuman primates and spreads through contact with bodily fluids of infected people and animals. Bats are thought to be the host reservoir for the virus. Also called Ebola virus.
2. An acute, usually fatal form of hemorrhagic fever that is caused by this virus and is characterized by fever, headache, muscle pain, vomiting, diarrhea, and bleeding, especially from the mucous membranes and gastrointestinal tract. Also called Ebola disease, Ebola hemorrhagic fever, Ebola virus disease.

Ebola,

river in Zaire, Africa.
Ebola hemorrhagic fever - Synonym(s): Ebola virus
Ebola virus - filovirus discovered in 1976, level 4 pathogen; severity of illness can run from mild to fatal in host. Synonym(s): Ebola hemorrhagic fever
References in periodicals archive ?
To model the introduction of CCCs, we assumed that Ebola virus-susceptible persons could also become infected with other febrile diseases that have Ebola virus disease-like symptoms, which we assumed had symptoms that lasted an average of 7 days.
In most of these countries the number of Ebola-related cases does not exceed ten, with the only exception of Nigeria, where 20 people are infected by Ebola virus and eight have died.
The west African country had come out of the epidemic, Ibrahima Soce Fall, the head of the Malian office of the United Nations Mission for Ebola Emergency Response (UNMEER), confirmed.
The Ebola virus epidemic is one of the greatest public health challenges of our time," said session moderator Barry Levy, MD, MPH, a former APHA president.
He explained that there was no risk of possible exposure of the Ebola virus to either the public or to the larger CDC campus.
According to the CDC, the 2014 Ebola Virus epidemic is the largest in history and is effecting multiple countries.
Today we are fueling 114 motorcycles that are going out into the districts to spread out Ebola awareness messages.
This is relevant for a number of contagious infections, including measles, avian influenza, the Middle East Respiratory Syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV) and Ebola.
Nigeria's health officials have had to trace and quarantine hundreds of people who had contact with the primary cases for 21 days, as part of concerted nationwide efforts at preventing the spread of Ebola that has reportedly killed about 4,922 in Sierra Leone, Guinea and Liberia, as at the end of October this year.
Public Health England said it is "unlikely" they have Ebola, with a spokesman adding: "The children are being tested for Ebola as a precaution due to uncertainty about where in Africa they are from.
Professor Paul Cosford, PHEs Director for Health Protection and Medical Director, said: Were pleased that the Ebola outbreak in West Africa has declined to a level that warrants reduced screening arrangements.
It is a setback for Liberia, one of three countries hit hardest by the worst Ebola outbreak in history.