earworm

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earworm

infestation of the ears of cattle by rhabditisbovis, often complicated by blowfly infestation.
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Now I've got jaw ache and an earworm wriggling to "Chattanooga Chew Chew".
Getting a song stuck in your head is known by many different names including stuck song syndrome, or earworm, a term translated from the German word Ohrwurm.
Agricultural Research Service scientists in College Station, Texas, have shown that signals routinely collected by the National Weather Service's (NWS) Doppler radar network could serve as an early-warning system to track the migration of corn earworms and other nighttime traveling pests.
Which is not surprising as researchers estimate that up to 98% of us have earworms from time to time.
But for all the advocacy of the singers, it is the piano which leaves the earworms.
1, 2010 /PRNewswire/ -- Earworms are songs that get stuck in your head and refuse to leave, playing over and over again in an endless loop.
The reduction in ear damage was similar to reduction in grain damage of about 52% from earworms and armyworms previously reported (Buntin et al.
The key concept distinguishing the Earworms approach to do-your-self language instruction is the very special 'musical brain training' technique developed by linguistic instructor Marion Lodge, who draws upon her more than 25 years of experience and expertise in teaching foreign languages.
The new language courses just released by Earworms Learning (mbt) Musical Brain Trainer uses music in a unique way leaving travellers with all the vocab and grammar they need, without requiring endless repetition of words or phrases.
A recent study by the University of Cincinnati looked at the affliction, which the study's author, James Kellaris, calls earworms.
Midwesterners call the insects corn earworms, but farmers elsewhere grumble about cotton bollworms and tomato fruitworms.
One day farmers might exchange pesticides for an industrial grade polymer that looks and acts like cotton candy as a major weapon against onion maggots, cabbage maggots, corn earworms and other agricultural pests.