earthworm

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earthworm

(ûrth′wûrm′)
n.
Any of various terrestrial annelid worms of the class Oligochaeta, especially those of the family Lumbricidae, that burrow into and help aerate and enrich soil.

earthworm

any ANNELID of the order Oligochaeta.

earthworm

the common oligochete worm of the genera Lumbricus, Allobophora, Eisenia etc.; they act as intermediate hosts for a number of internal parasites of livestock, and are reputed to bring anthrax spores to the surface and precipitate an outbreak of the disease.
References in periodicals archive ?
Generally, earthworms live less than three years, but some have been known to live as long as six years in captivity.
And he watched as earthworms immediately slithered up to the surface and crawled away from the mole.
Differences in the abundance of earthworms between spring and autumn were not observed under NT, regardless of the residue management, but under MT, earthworm abundance was significantly lower in autumn than in spring (Fig.
Most of our woodcock are returning from a winter in the bottomlands of Louisiana and Mississippi where earthworms are always available.
If there are earthworms on the roads or sidewalks when it rains it is because there is not enough organic matter in the soil so the water is concentrated and they will drown.
Alternatively, earthworm can also be used in fish feed as a protein source [26].
Earthworms are currently classified into three main functional groups: epigeic, living at the topsoil; endogeic, living near the soil surface; and the deep-burrowing, anecic species (Sheehan et al.
EACH earthworm is both male and female, producing both eggs and sperm.
The need for molecular studies on these earthworms is critical for several reasons.
Earthworms are usually the most heavily eaten food of eastern moles, Scalopus aquaticus, and scarabaeid larvae (grubworms), are also often very important.