Earthquake


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A geological event caused by shifting tectonic plates, triggered by a sudden release of energy in the Earth's crust that creates seismic waves. Earthquakes are recorded with a seismometer, also known as a seismograph. The moment magnitude (or the related and mostly obsolete Richter magnitude) of an earthquake is conventionally reported. Magnitudes of 3 or lower are mostly imperceptible; magnitudes of 7 or more cause serious damage over large areas. Intensity of shaking is measured on the modified Mercalli scale
Cause of death Direct trauma due to collapse of buildings, dehydration, shock, crush injury
References in periodicals archive ?
The network should be able to detect even the minutest of earthquakes and it should detect earthquake events from every corner of the country.
In general, we assume an earthquake is an earthquake.
The house, a full-scale model of an 1,800-square-foot townhouse like many found in California, is the largest wooden structure ever tested in a simulated earthquake, says Andre Filiatrault.
It depends on how the earthquake ruptures,'' said Debi Kilb, a Scripps seismologist.
As a result, the stress would not build enough on individual faults to trigger an earthquake.
The New World record falls far short of that in the Middle East, especially Israel and Jordan, where surface rupture and other earthquake effects can be related to precisely dated events dating back more than 2000 years.
According to a Takenaka Corporation spokesperson, the temple construction consists of wooden beam joints encircling huge pillars, which allow the different parts of the building to shift slowly during an earthquake, absorbing the seismic vibrations.
Elementary seismic-reinforcement techniques, such as constructing with ductile steel and properly weighted mixes of cement and sand or adding concrete reinforcement walls and steel bracing, can keep a building standing after an earthquake.
It was bigger than both the Northridge and San Fernando quakes," says Hutton, comparing the Indian earthquake to recent Southern California quakes she has studied.
Polling commissioned by IINC in partnership with Fireman's Fund Insurance Company last year found that 31 percent of California homeowners believe they have earthquake insurance coverage.
Others who felt the earthquake described it in more frantic terms to the Associated Press.