privacy

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Related to EU directive: EU Regulation

pri·va·cy

(prī'vă-sē),
1. Being apart from others; seclusion; secrecy.
2. Especially in psychiatry and clinical psychology, respect for the confidential nature of the therapist-patient relationship.

privacy

[prī′vəsē]
a culturally specific concept defining the degree of one's personal responsibility to others in regulating behavior that is regarded as intrusive. Some privacy-regulating mechanisms are physical barriers (closed doors or drawn curtains, such as around a hospital bed) and interpersonal types (lowered voices or cessation of smoking).
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Privacy curtains help ensure patient's privacy

privacy

Seclusion, freedom from disturbance or interference. Privacy has two intertwined components in the context of healthcare:
(1) The patient’s rights and expectations that personal health information is shared only between professionals who need it to manage the patient; in the UK access to such information is monitored by the provider’s Caldicott Guardian; and
(2) The physical space, clothing and other measures taken to ensure that the private conversations remain so, and that patients’ dignity is preserved and embarrassment minimised by providing appropriate clothing.

Pronunciation
Medspeak-UK: pronounced, PRIV uh see
Medspeak-US: pronounced, PRY vuh see

privacy

NIHspeak Control over the extent, timing, and circumstances of sharing oneself–physically, behaviorally, or intellectually with others

pri·va·cy

(prī'vă-sē)
1. Being apart from others; seclusion; secrecy.
2. Especially in psychiatry and clinical psychology, respect for the confidential nature of the therapist-patient relationship.

pri·va·cy

(prī'vă-sē)
1. Being apart from others; seclusion; secrecy.
2. Especially in psychiatry and clinical psychology, but also in all fields of dentistry and health care, respect for confidential nature of the clinician-patient relationship.

privacy,

n a culturally specific concept defining the degree of one's personal responsibility to others in regulating behavior that is regarded as intrusive.

Patient discussion about privacy

Q. I am upset by the lack of privacy at dialysis centers. Does anyone see their nephrologist in private office? My nephrologist comes to see me and examine me while I am receiving dialysis. I understand his talking to me but the exam is objectionable and I am unable to ask personal questions because everyone is listening. I am told they are all old and don't hear us but that is patronizing and extremely rude. Are there rules against this? Why can't we have office visits where there is some privacy?

A. I live in Sault Ste Marie Ontario Canada and if you need to ask personal questions you can make an appointment to see your doctor in the clinic.
But when I was in Calgary Alberta they would make you a appointment every 3 months to see the doctor.

More discussions about privacy
References in periodicals archive ?
Make no mistake, a decision to ignore an important EU directive together with unequivocal ministerial advice is a "policy decision" that our councillors should have made having been provided with clear unprejudiced advice from council officers, and is not a "technical issue" for unelected Council employees to make.
Even if the EU policies are not in line with the domestic (policy) ideology, implementation of EU Directives is regularly in time and proper.
We at EML have been aware of the EU directive for some time and have been considering the need for sustainability in products as well as recycling opportunities in store, culminating in the recent addition of a recycling lid to our Pro-bin.
The EU directive was prompted by new rules for all types of infant formula after scientific advice.
Recycling, though not yet widely used in E/E products, is one potential solution to recent EU directives on end-of-life recovery.
The EU directive on RoHS is just part of an ever-increasing push for more environmentally sound manufacturing policies.
The EU directive requires electronics manufacturers to significantly reduce lead and other selected content from their products by August 2006.
One example of over-elaboration is an EU directive on the labelling of air conditioners where 2,409 words became 7,504 words when it became law in the UK.
warned that lives could be put at risk by the delay in implementing an EU directive which is designed to give consumers greater protection.
Major topics covered include ECJ cases, harmonization progress, digital sales and the EU, cross-border mergers and the EU Directive, and VAT legislation.
The Caymans authority fears significant parts of its financial services industry could move elsewhere because of the EU directive.
The drivers want a pay rise to compensate for loss of income caused by an EU directive limiting overtime.