ES cells


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ES cells

abbrev. embryonic stem cells. see STEM CELLS.
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They began by comparing the genes expressed in ES cells to those expressed in 2CLCs.
Finally, We will apply these innovative technologies to questions about cellular heterogeneity and epigenomic regulation during early differentiation of es cells.
The hypothesis was that these cells should be less programmed than ES cells, which are taken from the 00-cell stage of development, called a blastocyst.
ES cells and iPS cells were similarly good at creating blood stem and progenitor cells when the technique was applied.
Research using human ES cells could help to better understand early human development, be used to research possible toxic effects of drugs (drug-screening) and, most importantly, be used in the field of regenerative medicine in the development of cell replacement therapies.
There are, of course, downsides of iPS Cells compared to ES Cells, they are its very low efficiency and success rate of producing viable pluripotent stem cells, its potential to form tumors, and ironically the rising ethical issues related to iPS cells research and clinical application.
Authentic ES cells have only been derived from mice and rats.
ES cells are different from fetal tissue (tissue taken from aborted babies, usually at several weeks or months after conception); ES cells are taken earlier during human life.
Xcelthera proprietary PluriXcel technology allows efficient derivation of clinical-grade human ES cell lines and direct conversion of such pluripotent human ES cells by small molecule induction into a large commercial scale of high quality human neuronal or heart muscle cells, which constitutes clinically representative progress in both human neuronal and cardiac therapeutic products for treating neurodegenerative and heart diseases.
These cells, which we designated iPS (induced pluripotent stem) cells, exhibit the morphology and growth properties of ES cells and express ES cell marker genes.
A South Korean scientist in 2004 announced the creation of cloned ES cells using human ova, but the claim later proved to be fake.