end of life

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end of life

Cardiac pacing
noun The point at which a pacemaker signals a need for replacement, as its battery is nearing depletion.
 
Medspeak
adjective Referring to a final period (hours, days, weeks, months) in a person’s life, in which it is medically obvious that death is imminent or a terminal moribund state cannot be prevented. As in, end-of-life care.

End-of-life care—making decisions 
Initiate discussion: 
• Establish supportive doctor-patient relationship;
• Designate surrogate decision maker;
• Identify patient’s general preferences.
Clarify prognosis: 
• Keep message clear, avoid misunderstanding;
• Acknowledge prognostic limitations.
Identify end-of-life goals: 
• Determine if preferences have changed;
• Identify individual priorities.
Develop treatment plan: 
• Help patient understand treatment options;
• Discuss resuscitation;
• Discuss palliative care.
References in periodicals archive ?
Moreover, medical studies have shown that the weight loss that occurs at the EOL is independent of the intake of food.
Thirty-nine percent of nurses had participated in EOL CE, and a majority of RNs (67%) had not experienced formal EOL instruction during initial nursing education.
Our colleagues in HPNA also have provided a variety of new position statements to assist us with understanding difficult EOL situations.
The EOL is now operated by a group of six scientific organizations, including three of its founders: Harvard University, the Marine Biological Laboratory, and the Smithsonian Institution.
This information may guide health services on how to integrate EOL care with dialysis management, and provide important information to enhance nephrology nursing education.
The headings displayed in the rooms were beneficial for guiding the learner through the different EOL content areas.
Madigan, Wiencek, and Vander Schrier (2009) examined availability patterns of community-based EOL providers in eight states of the United States.
This fourfold teaching strategy for EOL care proved to be efficient, engaging for faculty and students, and successful in improving students' skills in this critically important area.
Recovering the value of EOL products conserves resources and lowers energy consumption; remanufacturing a product requires about 25% of the energy consumed to manufacture it.
But medical ethicists routinely apply this paradigm to existentially frightening EOL matters in a medical world full of prognostic uncertainty.
Efforts made in previous decades to promote advance directives in the hospital context (Perkins, 2007) achieved only modest effects (Ramsaroop, Reid, & Adelman, 2007) and it was found that actual EOL care that was consistent with patient preference could not be ensured (Briggs, 2004).
This partnership will give EDX access to EOL notifications from Seagate and allow them to make purchases directly rather than through an intermediary.