electromagnetic spectrum

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electromagnetic spectrum

the range of frequencies and wavelengths associated with radiant energy.

e·lec·tro·mag·net·ic ra·di·a·tion

, electromagnetic spectrum (ĕ-lek'trō-mag-net'ik rā'dē-ā'shŭn, spek'trŭm)
Wavelike energy propagated through matter or space; varies widely in wavelength, frequency, photon energy, and properties; may be natural or artificial and includes radiowaves, microwaves, heat waves, visible light, ultraviolet light, x-rays, gamma rays, and cosmic radiation.

electromagnetic spectrum

The continuum of radiation, varying in frequency, and, correspondingly, wavelength, that includes, in order of decreasing frequency, cosmic ray photons, gamma rays, X rays, ultraviolet radiation, visible light, infrared radiation, microwaves, radio waves and heat.
Electromagnetic spectrumclick for a larger image
Fig. 142 Electromagnetic spectrum . The wavelength ranges of the electromagnetic spectrum.

electromagnetic spectrum

the entire range of wavelengths of electromagnetic radiation, most of which are not detectable by the human eye except in the visible spectrum from about 400–700 nm wavelength. Wavelengths shorter than the visible spectrum contain large quantities of energy which can be harmful to living material. See Fig. 141 . See X-RAY, GAMMA RADIATION, ULTRAVIOLET LIGHT.

electromagnetic spectrum (·lekˈ·trō·mag·neˑ·tik spekˑ·trm),

n the entire range of electromagnetic radiation that extends from the longest (radio waves) to the shortest (gamma radiation) wavelengths.

e·lec·tro·mag·net·ic ra·di·a·tion

, electromagnetic spectrum (ĕ-lek'trō-mag-net'ik rā'dē-ā'shŭn, spek'trŭm)
Wavelike energy propagated through matter or space; varies widely in wavelength, frequency, photon energy, and properties; may be natural or artificial and includes x-rays, gamma rays, and other forms.
References in periodicals archive ?
All the energies in the EM spectrum have different frequencies.
In order from slower-moving to faster-moving, frequencies in the EM spectrum include radio waves, microwaves, infrared light, visible light, ultraviolet light, X-rays, and gamma rays.
So far, I have been discussing electromagnetic radiation from the EM spectrum.
The EM spectrum is often compared to sound, since the two phenomena share many of the same features.
The frequency of a wave (expressed as cycles per second) that applies to the EM spectrum also applies to music (a subset of sound).
This is a clear message by Army leadership to the significance of having access to spectrum and the need to ensure we invest in future systems that can be used in an extremely complex and congested EM Spectrum Operational Environment.
I should mention that electronic warfare (EW) is inextricably connected to the EM spectrum.
For example, large-scale communications, radars, tactical data links and SIGINT (signals intelligence) collection transit the same EM spectrum as our EW systems.
We are at the very beginning of an effort to synchronize the planning and operation of our emitters across the entire EM spectrum.
A: We have made great strides in executing our EM Spectrum Usage Roadmap.
Brown: CJSMPT was in response to a Joint Urgent Operation Needs Statement from the warfighters to address immediate EM spectrum concerns.