End-of-Life Nursing Education Consortium

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End-of-Life Nursing Education Consortium

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ELNEC

An educational initiative for U.S. nurses to improve core clinical competencies in the care of dying patients.
References in periodicals archive ?
The case study was expanded to incorporate core ELNEC curricula, and both Julia and Lucy were considered patients throughout the final five weeks of the course.
Initially funded by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, ELNEC began as part of a national curriculum in nursing schools to improve end-of-life care.
The authors were pioneers in the ELNEC project, which sought to fill a void in EOL education (City of Hope, 2015).
As the ELNEC project evolved, nine modules were developed to be presented to trainees in a three-day program (Matzo, Sherman, Sheehan, Ferrell, & Penn, 2003).
ELNEC, funded by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, aims to develop a core of expert nursing educators and coordinate national nursing education efforts in end-of-life care.
This research revealed the experiences of new nurses who received ELNEC education in their nursing programs and who cared for dying patients within the first year of practice, highlighting issues they encountered and interventions they implemented to address these issues.
A comprehensive, national education program to improve end-of life care by nurses, ELNEC is funded by a major grant from the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation and aims to develop a core of expert nursing educators and coordinate national nursing education efforts in end-of-life care.
Finding the right words: The experience of new nurses after ELNEC education integrated into a BSN curriculum.
End-of-life nursing education consortium (ELNEC): Introduction to the ELNEC-core curriculum and to ELNEC pediatric palliative care.
Before ELNEC, there had not been a unified effort to prepare nurses in this area.
It would be useful if future workshops were able to provide participants with the opportunities to discover intended synergies when EPEC, ELNEC, and TNEEL materials are used to enhance the education of nurses, physicians, and other health professionals.
Although the initial eight ELNEC courses, supported by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, were designated for nurses who work with patients across the life span, it became evident that the ELNEC curriculum did not meet the distinctive requests of pediatric nurses.