SLC1A2

(redirected from EAAT2)

SLC1A2

A gene on chromosome 11p13-p12 that encodes solute carrier family 1 member 2, a high-affinity glutamate transporter that plays a key role in transporting glutamate across plasma membranes. In the brain, these transporters clear the excitatory neurotransmitter glutamate from the extracellular space at synapses in the CNS and maintain extracellular glutamate concentrations below neurotoxic levels.

Molecular biology
SLC1A2 mutations are associated with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.
References in periodicals archive ?
The gene, called EAAT2, had been linked with epilepsy, schizophrenia and mood and anxiety.
Although we knew that the EAAT2 gene has a crucial role to play in neurological processes in human and potentially in the development of migraine, until now, no genetic link has been identified to suggest that glutamate accumulation in the brain could play a role in common migraine," said Christian Kubisch of University of Ulm.
Yohay of Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions in Baltimore recently surveyed the amount of EAAT2 in glioma samples from 60 patients.
Rothstein recently screened more than 1,000 existing drugs, looking for ones that increase EAAT2 production.
The invention is directed toward the isolation, characterization and pharmacological use of the human amino acid transporter proteins EAAT1, EAAT2, EAAT3 and ASCT1.
Focal Loss of the glutamate transporter EAAT2 in a transgenic rat model of SOD1 mutant-mediated amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) (1604-1609, PNAS - Feb.
The gene, called EAAT2, has previously been linked with epilepsy, schizophrenia and mood and anxiety disorders.
Rothstein of Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore and his colleagues described a study of one glutamate transporter, EAAT2.
Others contained introns, non-protein-coding regions of the EAAT2 gene, in place of the gene's final exon.
The mutant mRNAs and the resulting absence of EAAT2 may explain an earlier finding by Rothstein's group that ALS patients have problems clearing glutamate (SN: 3/26/94, p.
The glutamate transporter EAAT2 is found only on glia, the support cells that surround neurons.
The test would determine if a drug actually changes the production of the target molecule, called EAAT2, in individual patients and thus evaluate new drug candidates more definitively.