chlorine

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chlorine

 (Cl) [klor´ēn]
a gaseous chemical element, atomic number 17, atomic weight 35.453. (See Appendix 6.) It is a disinfectant, decolorizer, and irritant poison. It is used for disinfecting, fumigating, and bleaching, either in an aqueous solution or in the form of chlorinated lime.

chlo·rine (Cl),

(klōr'ēn), Do not confuse this word with chlorin.
1. A greenish, toxic, gaseous element; atomic no. 17, atomic wt. 35.4527; a halogen used as a disinfectant and bleaching agent in the form of hypochlorite or of chlorine water, because of its oxidizing power.
2. The molecular form of chlorine (1), Cl2 (dichloride).
[G. chloros, greenish yellow]

chlorine

/chlo·rine/ (Cl) (klor´ēn) a chemical element, at. no. 17. It is a disinfectant, decolorant, and irritant poison, and is used for disinfecting, fumigating, and bleaching.

chlorine (Cl)

[klôr′ēn]
a yellowish green gaseous element of the halogen group. Its atomic number is 17; its atomic weight mass is 35.453. It has a strong, distinctive odor; is irritating to the respiratory tract; and is poisonous if ingested or inhaled. It occurs in nature chiefly as a component of sodium chloride in sea water and in salt deposits. It is used as a bleach and as a disinfectant to purify water for drinking or for use in swimming pools. Chlorine compounds in general use include many solvents, cleaning fluids, and chloroform. Most of the solvents and cleaning fluids containing chlorine are toxic when inhaled or ingested. Chloroform was formerly in general use as an anesthetic.

chlorine

A toxic gaseous element–atomic number 17, atomic weight 35.45, used as a bleaching agent; although clorine is the critical for metabolism, it is present as chloride, which has a valence of –1. See Chloride.

chlo·rine

(Cl) (klōr'ēn)
1. A greenish, toxic, gaseous element, atomic no. 17, atomic wt. 35.4527; a halogen used as a disinfectant and bleaching agent in the form of hypochlorite or chlorine water, because of its oxidizing power; also used as a chemical warfare agent.
2. The molecular form of chlorine (1), Cl2.
[G. chloros, greenish yellow]

chlo·rine

(klōr'ēn)
A greenish, toxic, gaseous element used as a disinfectant and bleaching agent in the form of hypochlorite or of chlorine water.
[G. chloros, greenish yellow]

chlorine,

n a yellowish-green gaseous element of the halogen group. It has a strong, distinctive odor that is irritating to the respiratory tract and is poisonous if ingested or inhaled. It occurs mainly as a compound of sodium chloride. It is used as a bleach and disinfectant. Chlorine compounds are used in solvents, cleaning fluids, and chloroform and formerly in general use as an anesthetic.

chlorine

a gaseous chemical element, atomic number 17, atomic weight 35.453, symbol Cl. See Table 6. It is a disinfectant, decolorizer and irritant poison. It is used for disinfecting, fumigating and bleaching, either in an aqueous solution or in the form of chlorinated lime. See also hypochlorite, chloramine.

chlorine dioxide
used in the aging of flour to make it more suitable for baking. Process does not produce toxic amino acid derivatives as other agents do. See also agene process.
chlorine disinfectants
compounds which have a high content of free chlorine and exert a disinfectant effect by releasing the chlorine.
chlorine gas
liberated from chlorine disinfectants and in factory effluents. Causes irritation to respiratory mucosa up to the point of pulmonary edema.

Patient discussion about chlorine

Q. Are throat nodulars caused by second hand smoke, allergy drip, and reflux. Also can chlorine and rust in water

A. Throat nodules, or also known as - vocal cord nodules, are usually caused by maximum contact between the two vocal cords. The cause of these formations are usually strenuous or abusive voice practices such as yelling and coughing. Persons who are often susceptible are those who use their voice constantly in a loud environment. Examples include teachers, cheerleaders, politicians, actors, musicians and singers. I am not sure I understand the question about chlorine and rust in water, I don't think these factors have a connection to vocal cord nodules. Other throat nodules can be cause by smoking (not as much in second hand smoke), alcohol or chewed tobbacco use.

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