dyspraxia

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dyspraxia

 [dis-prak´se-ah]
partial loss of ability to perform coordinated movements.

dys·prax·i·a

(dis-prak'sē-ă),
Impaired or painful functioning in any organ.
[dys- + G. praxis, a doing]

dyspraxia

/dys·prax·ia/ (dis-prak´se-ah) partial loss of ability to perform coordinated acts.

dyspraxia

[disprak′sē·ə]
Etymology: Gk, dys + prassein, to do
a partial loss of the ability to perform skilled, coordinated movements in the absence of any associated defect in motor or sensory functions. See also apraxia.
A term referring to a child whose fine and/or gross motor skills are immature, erratic, slow, imprecise; neurologic exam is normal; children may have cognitive or perceptual problems due to learning disabilities
Types Construction dyspraxia, dressing dyspraxia, ideational dyspraxia, ideomotor dyspraxia, oromotor dyspraxia

dyspraxia

1. Clumsy child syndrome, see there.
2. An extinct term for impaired or painful function of any organ of the body. See Speech dyspraxia Neurology A condition characterized by defective voluntary movement despite intact sensory and motor function Types Constructional, dressing, ideational, ideomotor, oromotor.

dys·prax·i·a

(dis-prak'sē-ă)
Difficulty in performing motor tasks.
[dys- + G. praxis, a doing]

dyspraxia

A disturbance of voluntary movement

dyspraxia

partial loss of ability to perform coordinated movements

dys·prax·i·a

(dis-prak'sē-ă)
Impaired or painful functioning in any organ.
[dys- + G. praxis, a doing]

dyspraxia

partial loss of ability to perform coordinated movements.

Patient discussion about dyspraxia

Q. What is Dyspraxia? My 5 year old son has been diagnosed with Dyspraxia. What is it? Does it have a cure?

A. Dyspraxia usually means that you son will have a hard time to learn and retain physical activities, and will also be hesitant and awkward in their performance. These are some of the symptoms you might notice in him now, before he reaches school age. The child is late in reaching milestones e.g. rolling over, sitting, standing, walking, and speaking. May not be able to run, hop, jump, or catch or kick a ball although their peers can do so, has difficulty in keeping friends; or judging how to behave in company. Has little understanding of concepts such as 'in', 'on', 'in front of' etc. Has difficulty in walking up and down stairs. Poor at dressing. Slow and hesitant in most actions. Appears not to be able to learn anything instinctively but must be taught skills. Falls over frequently. Poor pencil grip. Cannot do jigsaws or shape sorting games. Artwork is very immature. There is no cure for Dyspraxia, however your son can be taught to do everything by the appropriate specialists.

Q. My child, who has dypraxia, passed both TOVA & BRC. Help, I don't want to put him on ritalin but feel pres Since age 4 my child has received OT, ST and Physiotherpy. He is now 81/2 and has difficulties at school. Last year, after years of therapy, we went to a private Neuro Developmental Physiotherapist and she diagnosed him with Dyspraxia. I thought that my son was good at sport, but when she asked him to do the simplest of task like stand on one leg, or walk one foot infront of the other, he had great difficulty. He has diffculty processing information or thoughts and turning them into actions. This is especially evident in copying from the blackboard. His handwriting is extremely poor, even after many years, at much expence, of intense OT. His attention span is very poor, he daydreams and shuts down in class. The slightest noise, knock on the door, ticking clock etc wil break his concentration. He has passed both TOVA and BRC test, yet I am still under pressure from the school to put him on ritalin. I feel his concentration & attention problems are due to his Dyspraxia. Help

A. ritalin is not a sedative,it acts as a sedative in hyperative people.--methylphenidate is the same as ritalin but is cheeper. i know you are a good parent but sometimes you have to listen to the dr an therapist that work with these kinds of disorders.think about how this effects your child now--later on in life it might cause him to not go to college or get a job,not to say anything about his pears at school. there are a lot of other proplems with this disorder.

More discussions about dyspraxia