major depressive disorder

(redirected from Dysphoric mood)
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major depressive disorder

 
a mood disorder characterized by the occurrence of one or more major depressive epsiodes and the absence of any history of manic, mixed, or hypomanic episodes.

major depressive disorder

1. Synonym(s): major depression
2. a DSM diagnosis that is established when the specified criteria are met.

major depressive disorder

or

major depression

major depressive disorder

a major disorder of mood characterized by a persistent dysphoria, anxiety, irritability, fear, brooding, appetite and sleep disturbances, weight loss, psychomotor agitation or retardation, decreased energy, feelings of worthlessness or guilt, difficulty in concentrating or thinking, possible delusions and hallucinations, and thoughts of death or suicide. The disorder, which occurs in children, adolescents, and adults, may develop over a period of days, weeks, or months. Episodes may occur in clusters or singly, separated by several years of normality. The causes of the disorder are multiple and complex and may involve biological, psychological, interpersonal, and sociocultural factors that lead to an unidentifiable intrapsychic conflict. Treatment includes use of antidepressants and electroconvulsive therapy, followed by long-term psychotherapy. Nursing care is needed to ensure adequate nutrition, appropriate balance of fluid intake and output, good personal hygiene, and protection of the patient from self-injury. Also called major affective disorder, unipolar disorder. See also bipolar disorder, depression, dysthymic disorder.

major depressive disorder

A chronic, relapsing illness affecting 3–6% of the population at a given time.
 
Lifetime risk
10–15%; it is linked to a high (10%–20%) rate of suicide, and high morbidity when compared with other medical illness.
 
Statistics
Taiwan, 1.5%; Korea, 3%; Puerto Rico, 4.3%; US, 5%; New Zealand, 12%; France, 16.4%; Lebanon, 19%.

Other findings
Positive dexamethasone test, sleep changes (e.g., decreased REM latency).

Major depressive disorder, five or more criteria
• Decreased appetite or loss of weight;
• Decreased concentration; 
• Decreased interest-in pleasurable activities;
• Dysphoric mood—sad, anxious, irritable; 
• Fatigue or decreased energy;
• Guilt or excessive self-blame;
• Psychomotor retardation or agitation;
• Sleep disturbances; 
• Suicidal ideation or suicidal attempt. 
 
DiffDx
AIDS, acute intermittent porphyria, amphetamine withdrawal, CA, endocrine disease (e.g., Addision’s disease, Cushing’s disease), hypothyroidism, infectious mononucleosis, influenza, malnutrition, multiple sclerosis, drugs (e.g., alpha-methyldopa, benzodiazepines, cimetidine, clonidine, corticosteroids, INH, OCs, propranolol, reserpine, thiazide diuretics).

major depressive disorder

Psychiatry A chronic, relapsing illness affecting 3–6% of the population at a given time Lifetime risk 10–15%; it is linked to a high–10% to 20% rate of suicide, and high morbidity when compared with other medical illness Statistics, Intl, low Taiwan 1.5%, Korea 3%, Puerto Rico 4.3%, US 5% High Lebanon 19%, France 16.4%, New Zealand 12% Other findings Positive dexamethasone test, sleep changes–eg, ↓ REM latency DiffDx AIDS, acute intermittent porphyria, amphetamine withdrawal, CA, endocrine disease–eg, Addision's disease, Cushing's disease, hypothyroidism, infectious mononucleosis, influenza, malnutrition, multiple sclerosis, drugs–eg, alpha-methyldopa, benzodiazepines, cimetidine, clonidine, corticosteroids, INH, OCs, propranolol, reserpine, thiazide diuretics
Major depressive disorder, 5 or more criteria
appetite or loss of weight
concentration
• Dysphoric mood Sad, anxious, irritable
• Fatigue or decreased energy
• Guilt or excessive self blame
interest in pleasurable activities
• Psychomotor retardation or agitation
• Sleep disturbances
• Suicidal ideation or suicidal attempt  AMN  16/9/96, p17

ma·jor de·pres·sion

, major depressive disorder (mājŏr dĕ-preshŭn, dĕ-presiv dis-ōrdĕr)
Mental illness characterized by sustained depression of mood, anhedonia, sleep and appetite disturbances, and feelings of worthlessness, guilt, and hopelessness. Also called clinical depression.

Major depressive disorder

A mood disorder characterized by profound feelings of sadness or despair.
Mentioned in: Conduct Disorder

ma·jor de·pres·sion

, major depressive disorder (mājŏr dĕ-preshŭn, dĕ-presiv dis-ōrdĕr)
Mental disorder characterized by sustained depression of mood, anhedonia, sleep and appetite disturbances, and feelings of worthlessness, guilt, and hopelessness.

Patient discussion about major depressive disorder

Q. What is MDD? I have heard this term on the radio referring to general depression, however I wanted to know what exactly is MDD.

A. A friend I made through this service refered me to the NIMH. They have a very nice website for the National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH) full of accurate descriptions of all the kinds of depression and other mental illnesses.

http://www.nimh.nih.gov/



Under their Health and Outreach tab at:
http://www.nimh.nih.gov/health/index.shtml

Click on Depression which brings you to
http://www.nimh.nih.gov/health/topics/depression/index.shtml

and keep reading


Major depressive disorder, also called major depression, is characterized by a combination of symptoms that interfere with a person's ability to work, sleep, study, eat, and enjoy once–pleasurable activities. Major depression is disabling and prevents a person from functioning normally. An episode of major depression may occur only once in a person's lifetime, but more often, it recurs throughout a person's life.

http://www.nimh.nih.gov/health/publications/depression/what-is-a-depressive-disorder.shtml

Q. I like to know the signs of serious major depression in women? I am lecturer in a college who is very approachable to students. If you take the top 10 lectures in the college the students will vote me first. Though I am proud of it I am not jealous. One of the clubs chose me as the best lecturer of the year and wanted me to send to another country for a special training in their own expense. Now I am here in this training which lasts for 6 more months. First week I fell home sick without seeing my students and got depressed and moreover I could not CONCENTRATE in the training and COULD NOT SLEEP. I like to know the signs of serious major depression in women?

A. If I wish if I am a student then I like to get trained under you. I am jealous of your students. The symptoms of depression in women are the same as those for major depression.
Common complaints include:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iUTv_A2vUrI&eurl=http://www.imedix.com/health_community/viUTv%5EA2vUrI_final_stages_major_depression_can?q=major%20depression&feature=player_embedded
• Depressed mood Loss of interest or pleasure in activities you used to enjoy
• Feelings of guilt, hopelessness and worthlessness
• Suicidal thoughts or recurrent thoughts of death
• Sleep disturbance (sleeping more or sleeping less)
• Appetite and weight changes
• Difficulty concentrating
• Lack of energy and fatigue

More discussions about major depressive disorder
References in periodicals archive ?
Repetitive engaging in sexual fantasies, urges or behaviours in response to dysphoric mood states (e.
Although the term 'dysphoria,, in the narrower sense of irritable mood, is often used to designate mood states in different psychopathological conditions (including several personality disorders, affective disorders, organic psychoses, delusional disorders and schizophrenias)--and not only in borderline personality disorder--the quality and the consequences of dysphoric mood in borderlines is rather common.
Do you use the Internet as a way of escaping from problems or of relieving a dysphoric mood (e.
Although they can initially increase the sense of alertness, euphoria and concentration, their initial effect is commonly associated with a following irritability, dysphoric mood, difficulty in recalling, disturbed sleep and appetite, as well as tolerance, i.
He reported a severe continuous dysphoric mood that would improve for very short durations following cathinone ingestion.
The notion that memory-questonnaires tap aspects of well-being is shown by its close relationship to dysphoric mood and depressive disorder.
The primary purpose of this study, therefore, was to provide an initial investigation into the possible role that differing levels of experiential avoidance might play in participant responses to experimentally induced dysphoric mood.
Gambles as a way of escaping from problems or of relieving a dysphoric mood (e.
Exposure to the dysphoric mood or troublesome cognitions while emitting an alternative response permits contact with alternative reinforcers (such as meaningful interpersonal interactions, meeting personal goals, etc.
Moreover, it is becoming increasingly recognized that the emotional stress which typically accompanies periods of dysphoric mood possesses negative consequences for physical health as well as psychological well-being (Raglin, 1997).
A clearly depressed mood or, more often, a dysphoric mood, is not easily expressed.