Dutch elm disease


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Dutch elm disease

a disease of elm trees, caused by a fungus, Ceratostomella ulni, which blocks the XYLEM VESSELS, resulting in a lack of water to the aerial parts, leading to yellowing of the foliage, defoliation and eventual death. The fungus is carried by elm bark beetles such as Scolytus scolytus, which bore beneath the bark to lay eggs. The disease was probably introduced to Britain on timber imported from Canada, and reached epidemic proportions in the UK in the 1970s.
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Townsend's extensive research identified pure American elms that do in fact have a substantial tolerance for Dutch elm disease.
But those who still believe we have too many conifers in Wales can start replacing all those lost elms with the Princeton Elm, a variety with 96% resistance to Dutch Elm Disease.
Parks manager Peter Hamblin said, 'People will remember Dutch Elm Disease on the news 30 years ago, and the devastating effect it had on the landscape.
It was one of several that survived the Dutch elm disease outbreak.
Peter Goodwin of Woodland Heritage said: "We're looking at a disease that has the potential to change our landscape even more than Dutch elm disease and nothing is being done about it.
The state Department of Conservation and Recreation gave Oakham a $1,100 grant in February 2006 to prune dead limbs and inoculate the tree against Dutch elm disease.
Imported diseases in recent years have included classical swine fever, potato brown rot, wheat mozaic virus, leaf wilt, rhizomania and Dutch elm disease.
Elms were dying of the still-incurable Dutch elm disease.
The research team has created a batch of elm trees which can fight the deadly fungus that causes Dutch elm disease.
The gnarled and twisted trunks, each between five and 10ft long, are from trees which died of Dutch Elm Disease in the 1970s.
We have lost too many champions to Dutch elm disease, chestnut blight, and oak wilt to believe that.
We have an American elm (200+ years) that has had, and perhaps is still suffering with, Dutch elm disease.

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