Durham-Humphrey Amendment

Durham-Humphrey Amendment

a 1952 modification of the 1938 U.S. Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act. It differentiates between prescription and over-the-counter medications and specifies medications that can or cannot be refilled without a new prescription. It also identifies which original prescriptions and refills can be authorized over the telephone.
References in periodicals archive ?
Prior to the passage of the Durham-Humphrey Amendment to the Food, Drug and Cosmetic Act in 1951, there was no requirement that a drug needed a prescription for purchase.
The 1951 Durham-Humphrey Amendment defined the kinds of drugs that can't be safely used without medical supervision and restricted their sale to prescription by a licensed practitioner.
dagger]) The distinction between prescription and over-the-counter drugs in the United States emerged with the 1938 federal Food, Drug and Cosmetic Act, and was institutionalized 13 years later, with the Durham-Humphrey Amendment.
In 1950, the Durham-Humphrey Amendment defined several classes of drugs unsafe for self-medication and restricted their sale to prescription only.
1950 Durham-Humphrey Amendment defines some drugs unsafe for self-medication and restricts their sale to by-prescription-only by a licensed practitioner.
But in 1951 the Durham-Humphrey amendment to the Food, Drug and Cosmetic Act required labels to carry the warning "Caution: Federal law prohibits dispensing without a prescription.
In 1951 the Durham-Humphrey amendment to the FDCA established two main classes of drugs, prescription and over-the-counter.
THE DURHAM-HUMPHREY AMENDMENTS TO THE FEDERAL FOOD, DRUG AND
Section IV(A) will discuss the Durham-Humphrey Amendments, Section