direct-to-consumer advertising

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direct-to-consumer advertising

Drug industry The use of mass media–eg, TV, magazines, newspapers, to publicly promote drugs, medical devices or other products which, by law, require a prescription, which targets consumers, with the intent of having a Pt request the product by name. See Advertising. Cf 'Yellow' professionalism.

direct-to-consumer advertising

(dĭ-rĕkt′ too kŏn-soo′mĕr ăd′vĕr-tī″zĭng)
The marketing and sales of drugs, diagnostic or therapeutic services, and other medically related products or services by their owner or manufacturer to the general public by means of television, radio, the Internet, and direct mail. The most commonly advertised drugs are medications for allergies, arthritis, depression, erectile dysfunction, gastroesophageal reflux, and high blood pressure.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Thus, innovative firms are expected to capitalize more on brand recognition resulting from DTC advertising.
6 billion, was related to increased spending on DTC advertising, with each additional dollar in DTC advertising yielding an additional $4.
Changes to Food and Drug Administration (FDA) regulations in 1997 sparked a flood of DTC advertising of prescription drugs on televi1sion and radio.
This led to a three-fold growth in DTC advertising expenditure over four years, followed by an intensive debate about the effects of DTC advertising on patient and doctor behaviors.
The institute says Merck's DTC advertising bill for the COX-2 inhibitor rofecoxib (Vioxx) totalled USD $161 million in 2000.
In fact, pharmaceutical companies hocking drugs for a sundry of ailments including diabetes, obesity, AIDS, herpes, heartburn, and erectile dysfunction have seen their bottom lines bolster through DTC advertising.
The Rezulin ad is one of the most egregious abuses of direct-to-consumer (DTC) pharmaceutical advertising, but it is nonetheless emblematic of the problems inherent in DTC advertising.
12th Annual Survey on Consumer Reaction to DTC Advertising of Prescription Drugs.
Over this period, drug companies spent less each year on DTC advertising ($4.
Results suggest that (1) consumers support the prevetting of DTC ads, but not the banning of DTC ads, (2) their support for prior approval is unaffected by demographic, predispositional, and ad-effect perceptual differences, but (3) their support for a ban is associated with age, attitude toward DTC advertising, and perceptions of negative effects on self and others.
The Pharmaceutical Research and Manufacturers of America (PhRMA) has recognized the power of DTC advertising and recently released their "Guiding Principles" for advertising.