Dryvax


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Dryvax

(drī′vaks″)
A smallpox vaccine derived from the New York City Board of Health vaccinia virus strain, grown in calf lymph culture.
References in periodicals archive ?
Dryvax was used to create ACAM2000, which is made using a live poxvirus called vaccinia.
Acambis is investigating the side-effects, also seen in patients on rival drug Dryvax.
In primary vaccinees, the Dryvax package instructions are to give two or three insertions with the bifurcated needle.
The FDA relicensed Dryvax vaccine produced by Wyeth Lederle, with the production of a new vaccine-Acam--expected to be completed in May 2003, and licensure in early 2004.
Approximately 15 million doses of Dryvax vaccine have been stored since production stopped in 1983, however, it is speculated that should there be a biological attack involving smallpox, the available vaccine would not meet the demand.
It produces reactions and immune responses similar to those of first-generation Dryvax vaccine (Wyeth Laboratories, New York, NY, USA) (26).
The vaccine, which is derived from Dryvax, the currently licensed smallpox vaccine, is not being considered for use in the general population.
ACAM2000 has been tested in just under 3,000 subjects and its clinical safety has been shown to be the same or better than that of Dryvax.
The only effective prophylaxis available is the vaccinia vaccine, licensed in the USA under the trade name Dryvax (manufactured by Wyeth, Philadelphia, Pa).
ACAM2000 is the second-generation smallpox vaccine, which replaced Dryvax in January/February 2008 (7).
The poster reports on the licensed smallpox vaccine, Dryvax, and LC16m8 in an established animal neurovirulence test.
Adverse events and the extent of humoral and cellular immune responses were similar in the two vaccine groups, and the cell-cultured vaccine was effective at a dose 50 times lower than the dose of Dryvax (Lancet 2005;365:398-409).