nymph

(redirected from Dryads)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
Related to Dryads: hamadryad

nymph

 [nimf]
a developmental stage in certain arthropods (e.g., ticks) between the larval form and the adult; it resembles an adult but does not have fully developed wings or genitalia.

nymph

(nimf),
1. The earliest series of stages in metamorphosis following hatching in the development of hemimetabolous insects (for example, locusts); the nymph resembles the adult in many respects, but lacks full wing or genitalia development; it grows through successive instars without any intermediate or pupal stage into the imago or adult form.
See also: incomplete metamorphosis, complete metamorphosis.
2. The third stage in the life cycle of a tick, between the larva and the adult.
[G. nymphē, maiden]

nymph

(nimf) a developmental stage in certain arthropods, e.g., ticks, between the larval form and the adult, and resembling the latter in appearance.

nymph

(nĭmf)
n.
a. The immature form of an insect, such as a grasshopper, that does not pass through a pupal stage during metamorphosis. Nymphs resemble adults but are smaller and lack fully developed wings.
b. The eight-legged immature form of certain arachnids, such as ticks and mites.

nymph′al (nĭm′fəl) adj.

nymph

the immature stages of any EXOPTERYGOTE, such as the mayfly It has compound eyes and mouthparts like the adult, but usually lacks wings (though traces are sometimes present) and is sexually immature. See METAMORPHOSIS, ENDOPTERYGOTE.

nymph

a developmental stage in certain arthropods (e.g. ticks, mites and lice) between the larval form and the adult, and resembling the latter in appearance.
References in periodicals archive ?
In Greek mythology the dryad was a spirit in the form of a young maiden or woman.
Sylvia Plath, too, invoked dryads in a pair of poems of 1957.
Deprived of the soothing melodies of the "light-winged Dryad of the trees," (16) they are forced to recognize the uselessness of "the strife / To oppose" and to reject the Romantic dream of escaping to an uncorrupted dimension.
From the first moment of Sylvia, when the dryads bourree in from the wings, they look boxed-in--and they are.
3) Only by placing the Coetzee text and the Hofmannsthal precursor side by side will we find out about the vicissitudes of desire that make fictional Philip Chandos, in the words of Elizabeth (Coetzee 2003a: 227), "gaze like one bewitched at paintings of sirens and dryads, craving to enter their naked, glistening bodies".
The nymphs and dryads had "sacralized" the streams and woods, lending the divine a "local habitation and a name.
This season, Ellis will perform as a gypsy in Cranko's Romeo and Juliet, a pas de deux in Christopher Wheeldon's Polyphonia, the second girl in Robbins' Fang, Free, and the stately: queen of the Dryads in Don Quixote.
All of Picasso before 1922 is here: impeccable cast drawings; voguish charcoal portraits of obscure Barcelona artists; Fernande Olivier as an unlikely Earth Mother of Gosol; monumental dryads of the Demoiselles period; crystalline cubist townscapes.
Part I brings to the stage the central figures of Fimi's study, Tolkien's elves--in their earliest conception: fairies, dryads, gnomes, and so on.
The ballet follows Peter, Susan, Edmund and Lucy through the wardrobe into a land of fauns and forest nymphs, naiads and dryads and an array of fanciful creatures.
Unless I got every single thing wrong, and something isn't decanting its ocean of heartbreak juice over and through the imbricate seedheads of grasses, through those thousand waving arms, through things on thrones, breechings at sea, oud music, types and fonts, major but mostly minor, noble but mostly base, bituminous and anthracite in the airless dark, phases, tides, witherings and blunderings and burnings-down to the ground, elements, vessels, organs, circuits, the way fiddles finish in scrolls and old scrolls fox themselves to death, fractals, flavors, dryads, trochees, disgraces and insufficiencies, over particles, through waves, through lists, through iambs, through lamb, venison, pork, through Blake and Kit Smart and Whitman and Ginsberg, through secret suffering inward everything.
The title of his paper, "And Still the Dryads Linger," indicated his thesis that we have not yet expunged these animistic explanations from psychology.