Drug-Free Workplace Act of 1988


Also found in: Acronyms, Wikipedia.

Drug-Free Workplace Act of 1988

Federal legislation requiring all organizations applying for federal grants to certify that a “good faith” effort will be made to prevent substance abuse in the workplace.
References in periodicals archive ?
The federal Drug-Free Workplace Act of 1988 has brought much needed awareness to the issue of substance abuse.
The federal Drug-Free Workplace Act of 1988 only governs businesses that have federal contracts of over $25,000 (single contract).
For local governments, the most pertinent federal employment laws are: Family and Medical Leave Act, Civil Rights Acts of 1964 (Title VII) and 1991, Rehabilitation Act of 1973 (Title V), Age Discrimination in Employment Act, Drug-Free Workplace Act of 1988, Occupational Safety and Health Act, and Fair Labor Standards Act.
Those statutes are The Drug-Free Workplace Act of 1988 and The Drug-Free Schools and Communities Act amendments of 1989.
These requirements have been mandated by the Department of Defense's Drug-Free Work Force Rules, the Drug-Free Workplace Act of 1988, and the Department of Transportation's Procedures for Workplace Drug Testing Programs.
Two years later, Congress approved the Drug-Free Workplace Act of 1988, which demanded that all federal grant recipients and many contractors "maintain a drug-free workplace.
The Drug-Free Workplace Act of 1988 was the first declaration of the war on drugs in the workplace.
The Drug-Free Workplace Act of 1988 mandates the establishment of comprehensive substance abuse programs by federal contractors, federal grant recipients, or anyone operating under federal funding exceeding $25,000.