hepatotoxicity

(redirected from Drug induced liver disease)
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hep·a·to·tox·ic·i·ty

(hep'ă-tō-tok-sis'i-tē),
The capacity of a drug, chemical, or other exposure to produce injury to the liver. Agents with recognized hepatotoxicity include carbon tetrachloride, alcohol, dantrolene sodium, valproic acid, and isonicotinic acid hydrazide.

hepatotoxicity

(hĕp′ə-tō-tŏk-sĭs′ĭ-tē, hĭ-păt′ō-)
n.
1. The quality or condition of being toxic or destructive to the liver.
2. The capacity of a substance to have damaging effects on the liver.

hep′a·to·tox′ic (-tŏk′sĭk) adj.

hepatotoxicity

[hep′ətōtoksis′itē]
Etymology: Gk, hēpar + toxikon, poison
the tendency of an agent, usually a drug or alcohol, to have a destructive effect on the liver.

hep·a·to·tox·ic·i·ty

(hep'ă-tō-tok-sis'i-tē)
The capacity of a drug, chemical, or other exposure to produce injury to the liver.

hepatotoxicity

The state of being poisonous (toxic) to the liver, or the degree to which a substance is toxic to the liver.

hepatotoxicity (hepˑ··tō·tkˈ·si·sit·ē),

n liver toxicity.

hep·a·to·tox·ic·i·ty

(hep'ă-tō-tok-sis'i-tē)
Capacity of a drug, chemical, or other exposure to injure the liver.