efficacy

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efficacy

 [ef´ĭ-kah″se]
1. the ability of a drug to achieve the desired effect.
2. the degree to which an intervention accomplishes the desired or projected outcomes.

ef·fi·ca·cy

(ef'ĭ-kă-sē),
The extent to which a specific intervention, procedure, regimen, or service produces a beneficial result under ideal conditions. Compare: effectiveness.
[L. efficacia, fr, ef-ficio, to perform, accomplish]

efficacy

/ef·fi·ca·cy/ (ef´ĭ-kah-se)
1. the ability of an intervention to produce the desired beneficial effect in expert hands and under ideal circumstances.
2. the ability of a drug to produce the desired therapeutic effect.
Dose-effect curve for two drugs of different efficacy: The efficacy of drug A is greater than that of drug B.

efficacy

[ef′əkəsē]
Etymology: L, effectus, performance
(of a drug or treatment) the ability of a drug or treatment to produce a specific result, regardless of dosage. Opioids have a nearly identical efficacy but require various dosages to obtain the effect.

efficacy

In the context of evidence-based medicine, the capacity of a drug or therapy to positively influence the course or duration of a disease at the dose tested in the patient population for which it is designed and has been tested.

efficacy

An index of the potency of a drug or disease treatment; for a vaccine, efficacy is the percentage of persons who are protected by the vaccine

ef·fi·ca·cy

(ef'i-kă-sē)
1. nursing The success or effectiveness of a treatment.
2. The power to produce a desired effect.
[L. efficacia, fr, ef-ficio, to perform, accomplish]

ef·fi·ca·cy

(ef'i-kă-sē)
Extent to which a specific intervention, procedure, regimen, or service produces a beneficial result under ideal conditions.
Compare: effectiveness
[L. efficacia, fr, ef-ficio, to perform, accomplish]

efficacy

(ef´ikəsē),
n the ability to provide a clinically measurable effect, preferably beneficial.

efficacy

intrinsic activity; is equal to the magnitude of the maximal response.

Patient discussion about efficacy

Q. What do you think about the efficacy of Chinese medicine?

A. Did you know that Traditional Chinese Medicine works around the lungs, kidneys, liver and heart? Besides this, TCM also works around the small and large intestines, stomach, gall bladder and the urinary bladder. Being connected with ‘qi’ energy and blood, the vital substance, circulating through them, TCM uses a holistic approach to harmonizing the functions of these organs. TCM has deployed the theory that all structures in the body should work in tandem with the other and with the environment that surrounds us.


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=p7_uSB8PFak&eurl=http://www.imedix.com/health_community/vYxQXX7cSjv4_locating_acupuncture_points_free_online_guide?q=chinese%20medicineiurl=http://i2.ytimg.com/vi/YxQXX7cSjv4/hqdefault.jpg&feature=player_embedded

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References in periodicals archive ?
In Turku University Central Hospital, coding of drug effects in clinical chemistry was started in 1995 when a DLE code was developed (9).
As for neonatal toxicity direct drug effects and withdrawal syndrome occurred in some neonates whose mothers took tricyclics, fluoxetine, and SSRIs near term.
The syndrome doesn't include outbursts that stem from other mental disorders or from alcohol or drug effects.
Serious adverse drug effects in patients led to the withdrawal or restriction of four quinolones in the past decade (temafloxacin, grepafloxacin, trovafloxacin, and sparfloxacin).
Aside from the unnecessary distress and inconvenience suffered by the 60 patients who experienced preventable adverse drug effects at Brigham & Women's Hospital during the course of another 1997 study, the expense of their treatment -- almost five days added to their stays in the hospital -- was inflated by close to $6,000 each.
This involves identifying drug effects by associative changes in microRNA expression profiles and their analysis in context against a growing proprietary database of known drug responses.
Product development of Bii will focus on monitoring, interpreting and predicting off-target drug effects.
For studies of drug effects on behavior, anesthesia is no alternative.
HIV-TB co-infection often results in increased frequency of adverse drug effects, which may reduce compliance and increase induction of drug resistance.
Nucleic acid based toxicity biomarkers discovered through this process may assist in the early detection of toxic drug effects and may therefore enable such drug candidates not to progress into more expensive drug development stages.
By providing definitive answers to critical questions about drug effects, our study will enable Pfizer to make strategic decisions regarding the future development of their drug.
In contrast, orange juice extracts didn't contain bergamottin at all--in accordance with the observation that orange juice doesn't cause the same drug effects.

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