xerophyte

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xerophyte

a plant that is adapted to growing in areas with low or irregular supplies of water. Various modifications can be noted which reduce water loss by TRANSPIRATION: sunken STOMATA (e.g. Pinus); rolled leaves with the stomata on the inner surface only (e.g. MARRAM GRASS); development of leaf spines (e.g. gorse); possession of small leaves (e.g. many heathers). Compare HYDROPHYTE, MESOPHYTE.
References in periodicals archive ?
Arlene Lewis, a nursery professional at Sheridan Gardens Nursery in Burbank, finds that most of the customers interested in drought-tolerant plants are new gardeners or those starting over with their yards.
Most drought-tolerant plants will have either aromatic leaves, fleshy and succulent leaves (which store moisture for dry spells), grey leaves, hairy leaves (which shade themselves with their own hairs), long narrow leaves (which are good at shedding heat without water), or spikes (which act as "fins" to cool the plant).
Here are a few tips to help your treasured but not heat- or drought-tolerant plants cope with extreme temperatures.
Illustrated with color photos, design sketches, and illustrations on every page, this guide for homeowners and business owners shows how to combine ecological principles with design principles to create beautiful home or office landscapes that require only minimal resources to maintain, using drought-tolerant plants native to the Intermountain West region.
The design blended water with drought-tolerant plants and synthetic materials to highlight principles and use of water movement and conservation.
Ideally, we'd like to see Angelenos change their habits in longer-lasting ways, such as landscaping with drought-tolerant plants.
Institutions can also follow the example of California State University, Fullerton, and landscape with drought-tolerant plants or install cisterns to catch rainwater, as the University of Denver and Xavier University (Ohio) do.
Gravel gardens are best sited in full sun as this favours the majority of drought-tolerant plants.
In many arid regions, environmentally conscious gardeners who want to conserve water eschew lush lawns and instead grow indigenous drought-tolerant plants amid arrangements of ornamental rocks.