foot drop

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foot drop

Loss of the ability to bend the ankle so that the foot rises. This may be due to disorders of the lower spinal cord or of the nerves to the muscles that flex the ankle. Foot drop seriously interferes with walking. A foot brace may be necessary.

foot drop

paralysis/weakness of all or some extensor/dorsiflexor lower-leg muscles (i.e. tibialis anterior, extensor hallucis longus, extensor hallucis brevis, peroneus tertius) due to upper or lower motor neurone lesions (see Table 1), or traumatic severance of common peroneal nerve at neck of fibula, causing loss of dorsiflexion during gait; deceleration at heel contact is lost, the foot 'flaps' into contact with the ground surface, and toes drag against the floor during swing phase of gait; ambulation is assisted by use of an ankle-foot orthosis (AFO), preventing uncontrolled ankle joint plantarflexion
Table 1: Effects of damage to upper and lower motor neurones
Upper motor neurone lesionLower motor neurone lesion
ParalysisSpastic-type contractureFlaccid-type contractures may develop
Tendon reflexesExaggerated; hyperreflexiaReduced/absent; hyporeflexia
Plantar responseExtensor (Babinski's sign positive)Flexor (= normal; Babinski's sign negative)
Extraneous muscle activityNo fasciculations/fibrillationsFasciculations and fibrillations
References in periodicals archive ?
Three dimensional inertial sensing of foot movements for automatic tuning of a two-channel implantable drop-foot stimulator.
Long-term followup of patients using the ActiGait implanted drop-foot stimulator.
Imagine hospital gowns with sensors to monitor patient needs or an embedded sensor in prosthesis to compensate for drop-foot syndrome.
The results of these studies indicated that the dorsiflexion assistive moment at initial contact was comparatively larger than that during swing phase to prevent drop-foot in patients with hemiplegia; recommendations for AFO design were therefore proposed [37].
Polypropylene ankle foot orthoses to overcome drop-foot gait in central neurological patients: A mechanical and functional evaluation.