genome

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genome

 [je´nōm]
the complete set of genes, hereditary factors contained in the haploid set of chromosomes; the human genome has an estimated 30,000 to 40,000 genes. adj., adj genom´ic.

ge·nome

(je'nōm, -nom),
1. A complete set of chromosomes derived from one parent, the haploid number of a gamete.
See also: Human Genome Project.
2. The total gene complement of a set of chromosomes found in higher life forms (the haploid set in a eukaryotic cell), or the functionally similar but simpler linear arrangements found in bacteria and viruses.
See also: Human Genome Project.
[gene + -ome, suffix denoting a defined system or microcosm, fr. G. -ōma, noun suffix]

genome

/ge·nome/ (je´nōm) the complete set of hereditary factors contained in the haploid set of chromosomes.genom´ic

genome

(jē′nōm′)
n.
1. The total genetic content contained in a haploid set of chromosomes in eukaryotes, in a single chromosome in bacteria or archaea, or in the DNA or RNA of viruses.
2. An organism's genetic material.

ge·no′mic (-nō′mĭk) adj.

genome

[jē′nōm]
Etymology: Gk, genein, to produce
the complete set of genes in the chromosomes of each cell of a specific organism. genomic, adj.

genome

Genetic structure Genetics All the genetic information in an organism's chromosomes and mitochondria; its size is given in base pairs. See Base pair, Chromosome, Mitochondrial genome, Nuclear genome.

ge·nome

(jē'nōm)
1. A complete set of chromosomes derived from one parent, the haploid number of a gamete.
2. The total gene complement of a set of chromosomes found in higher life forms (the haploid set in a eukaryotic cell), or the functionally similar but simpler linear arrangements found in bacteria and viruses.
See also: Human Genome Project
[G. genos, birth + (chromos) ome]

genome

The complete set of CHROMOSOMES, together with the MITOCHONDRIAL DNA, containing the entire genetic material of the cell.

genome

the complete complement of genetic material in a cell, or carried by an individual.

Genome

The genetic makeup of a cell, composed of DNA.
Mentioned in: Malignant Melanoma

genome

total gene complement of a set of chromosomes

genome

The complete set of genes in an individual. In humans it is estimated at approximately 30 000 genes and over three billion base pairs (two nucleotides joined together across a double helix) of DNA.

ge·nome

(jē'nōm)
Complete set of chromosomes derived from one parent; haploid number of a gamete.

genome (jē´nōm),

n the total gene complement of a set of chromosomes found in higher life forms.
genome, human,
n the complete set of genes in the chromosomes of each cell.

genome

all of the genes carried by a gamete, i.e. the complete set of hereditary factors contained in the chromosomal DNA. For some viruses, the genome is RNA.

diploid genome
having two genetically identical RNA molecules of RNA, characteristic of retroviruses.
integrated genome
the integration of the viral DNA into the cellular DNA of the host, as occurs in some kinds of persistent infections and the induction of tumors.
segmented genome
the genome is composed of separate segments. A characteristic of some viruses.
References in periodicals archive ?
The draft sequence, often referred to as the "Book of Life" (1) represents the culmination of fifteen years of collaborative/ parallel efforts of scientists in more than 20 sequencing centers in six countries.
Based on the information from the draft sequence of the human genome, researchers have estimated that the total number of human genes is approximately 30,000 to 40,000 (Claverie 2001).
Since President Clinton announced that the draft sequence of the human genome was completed in 2000, research about specific types of cancers grew exponentially.
The draft sequence, which is about 98 percent complete, will allow researchers to pinpoint genes that are useful to pork production or are involved in immunity or other important physiological processes in the pig.
An epilogue by R Scott Hawley and an afterword by Ethan Brier provide perspective on the importance of this sequencing saga, which would turn out to be a prelude to the much anticipated announcement of the draft sequence of the human genome in February 2001.
The campus of Michigan State University is home to Female #256, the Red Jungle Fowl (Gallus gallus) chicken whose blood samples gave researchers the 1 billion DNA units needed to create the first high-quality draft sequence of the chicken genome.
Dr Greg Elgar, a member of the UK team from the Medical Research Council's Human Genome Mapping Resource Centre in Cambridge, said, "Finishing the draft sequence of the pufferfish genome is the culmination of a decade of research and we're very excited about the implications this has for human disease.
As of August 10, 2000, draft sequence was available for 87% of the human genome (http://www.
Since the first published draft sequence of the human genome, our knowledge in genetics has exponentially increased," says Dr.
What we learned from assembling the draft sequence of a fungus, we can now apply to sequencing human genomes," Head of Bioinfomatics at the BC Cancer Agency's Genome Sciences Centre underlined.
The potato is the most important vegetable worldwide," said Robin Buell, an MSU (Michigan State University) associate professor of plant biology, who was part of the consortium that released the first draft sequence of the potato genome.

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