Dracunculus medinensis


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Dra·cun·cu·lus me·di·nen·'sis

a species of skin-infecting, 36" nematodes, formerly incorrectly classed as Filaria; adult worms live anywhere in the body of humans and various semiaquatic mammals; the females migrate along fascial planes to subcutaneous tissues, where troublesome chronic ulcers are formed in the skin; when the host enters water, larvae are discharged from the ulcers, from which the head of the female worm protrudes; these larvae, if ingested by Cyclops species, develop in the intermediate host to the infective stage; humans and various animals contract the infection from accidental ingestion of infected Cyclops in drinking water. Popularly known as guinea, Medina, serpent, or dragon worm, and frequently thought to be the "fiery serpent" that plagued the Israelites.
[L. of Medina]

Dracunculus medinensis

[drakun′kyoo͡ləs]
a parasitic nematode of the Mediterranean area that causes dracunculiasis. An American species is Dracunculus insignis. Also called dragon worm, fiery serpent, guinea worm.

Dracunculus

(dra-kung'kyu-lus) [L. dracunculus, small dragon]
A genus of parasitic nematodes of the family Dracunculidae.

Dracunculus medinensis

See: guinea wormillustration

Dracunculus

a genus of spiruroid nematode parasites in the family Dracunculidae. Includes D. alii, D. dahomensis, D. globocephalus, D. ophidensis (all in reptiles), D. fuelliborni (in opossum); D. lutrae (in otter),

Dracunculus insignis
a spiruroid worm infesting dogs and wild carnivores. Causes cutaneous lesions and ulcers, sometimes internal lesions, e.g. in heart and vertebral column. Called also dragon, fiery dragon, guinea worm.
Dracunculus medinensis
a thread-like worm widely distributed in North America, Africa, the Near East, East Indies and India; frequently found in the subcutaneous and intermuscular tissues of humans and also in dogs, sometimes horses and cattle. Causes cutaneous nodules and subsequently ulcers.
References in periodicals archive ?
The early stages of the development of Dracunculus medinensis (Linnaeus) in the mammalian host.
Editorial Note: Dracunculiasis is a parasitic infection caused by Dracunculus medinensis.
Differentiation of Dracunculus medinensis and Dracunculus insignis by sequence analysis of the 18S RNA.
Guinea worm disease) in 1991, recorded substantial declines in the reported incidence of the parasitic infection caused by Dracunculus medinensis.
This disease is contracted only by persons who drink water contaminated by tiny copepods containing larval stages of the parasite Dracunculus medinensis.