Dracunculus


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Related to Dracunculus: Dracunculus vulgaris, Dracunculus medinensis

Dracunculus

 [drah-kung´ku-lus]
a genus of parasitic nematodes. D. medinen′sis is a threadlike worm widely distributed in North America, Africa, the Middle East, Indonesia, and India; frequently found in the subcutaneous and intermuscular tissues of humans and certain other animals. See illustration.
Dracunculus medinensis. From Dorland's, 2000.

Dracunculus

(dra-kŭng'kyū-lŭs),
A genus of nematodes (superfamily Dracunculoidea) that have some resemblances to true filarial worms; however, adults are larger (females being as long as 1 m), and the intermediate host is a freshwater crustacean rather than an insect.
[L. dim. of draco, serpent]

Dracunculus

/Dra·cun·cu·lus/ (-lus) a genus of nematode parasites, including D. medinen´sis (guinea worm), a threadlike worm, 30–120 cm. long, widely distributed in India, Africa, and Arabia, inhabiting subcutaneous and intermuscular tissues of humans and other animals.

Dra·cun·cu·lus

(dră-kŭng'kyū-lŭs)
A genus of nematodes with some resemblance to true filarial worms; adults are larger and the intermediate host is a freshwater crustacean rather than an insect.
[L. dim. of draco, serpent]

Dracunculus

a genus of spiruroid nematode parasites in the family Dracunculidae. Includes D. alii, D. dahomensis, D. globocephalus, D. ophidensis (all in reptiles), D. fuelliborni (in opossum); D. lutrae (in otter),

Dracunculus insignis
a spiruroid worm infesting dogs and wild carnivores. Causes cutaneous lesions and ulcers, sometimes internal lesions, e.g. in heart and vertebral column. Called also dragon, fiery dragon, guinea worm.
Dracunculus medinensis
a thread-like worm widely distributed in North America, Africa, the Near East, East Indies and India; frequently found in the subcutaneous and intermuscular tissues of humans and also in dogs, sometimes horses and cattle. Causes cutaneous nodules and subsequently ulcers.
References in periodicals archive ?
Thus in botany there is a generic name Dracunculus Mill.
Determination of the chemical composition and antioxidant activity of the essential oil of Artemisia dracunculus and of the antifungal and antibacterial activities of Turkish Artemisia absinthium, A.
Its caterpillars feed almost exclusively upon green sage (Artemisia dracunculus L.
The studies reported here were undertaken to examine the antihyperglycemic activity of an ethanolic extract of Artemisia dracunculus L.