pyridoxine

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Related to Doxine: Doxycycline hyclate, Doxylin

pyridoxine

 [pir″ĭ-dok´sēn]
one of the forms of vitamin B6, used as the hydrochloride salt in the prophylaxis and treatment of vitamin B6 deficiency. It is also used in counteracting the neurotoxic effects of isoniazid and as an antidote to cycloserine.

pyr·i·dox·ine

(pir'i-dok'sēn),
The original vitamin B6; term now includes pyridoxal and pyridoxamine, associated with the use of unsaturated fatty acids. In rats, deficiency produces a nutritional dermatitis and acrodynia; in humans, deficiency may result in increased irritability, convulsions, and peripheral neuritis. The hydrochloride is used in pharmaceutic preparations; found naturally in some vegetables.

pyridoxine

/pyr·i·dox·ine/ (pir″ĭ-dok´sēn) one of the forms of vitamin B6, used as the hydrochloride salt in the prophylaxis and treatment of vitamin B6 deficiency and as an antidote in cycloserine and isoniazid poisoning.

pyridoxine

(pĭr′ĭ-dŏk′sēn, -sĭn) also

pyridoxin

(-dŏk′sĭn)
n.
A pyridine derivative, C8H11NO3, that is one of several forms of vitamin B6 and is the form typically found in vitamin supplements and enriched foods.

pyridoxine

[pir′ədok′sēn]
a water-soluble white crystalline vitamin that is part of the B complex. It is derived from pyridine and converted in the body to pyridoxal and pyridoxamine for synthesis. It functions as a coenzyme essential for the synthesis and breakdown of amino acids, the conversion of tryptophan to niacin, the breakdown of glycogen to glucose 1-phosphate, the production of antibodies, the formation of heme in hemoglobin, the formation of hormones important in brain function, the proper absorption of vitamin B12, the production of hydrochloric acid and magnesium, and the maintenance of the balance of sodium and potassium, which regulates body fluids and the functioning of the nervous and musculoskeletal systems. Rich dietary sources are meats, especially organ meats; whole-grain cereals; soybeans; peanuts; wheat germ; and brewer's yeast. Milk and green vegetables supply smaller amounts. The most common symptoms of deficiency are seborrheic dermatitis about the eyes, nose, and mouth and behind the ears; cheilosis; glossitis and stomatitis; nervousness; depression; peripheral neuropathy; and lymphopenia, leading to convulsions in infants and anemia in adults. Treatment and prophylaxis consist of administration of the vitamin and a diet rich in foods containing it. Several drugs interfere with the use of pyridoxine, notably isoniazid and penicillamine, and supplements of the vitamin are recommended with the use of these drugs. The need for increased amounts of pyridoxine is related to protein intake and occurs during pregnancy, lactation, exposure to radiation, cardiac failure, aging, and use of oral contraceptives. Also called pyridoxine hydrochloride, vitamin B6.

pyridoxine

Nutrition A form of vitamin B6 used with INH for TB to prevent peripheral neuropathy. See Vitamin B6.

pyr·i·dox·ine

(pir'i-dok'sēn)
The original vitamin B6; a term that now includes pyridoxal and pyridoxamine; necessary for various functions including amino acid metabolism and synthesis of heme, histamine, and dopamine. Deficiency may result in increased irritability, convulsions, and peripheral neuritis. The hydrochloride is used in pharmaceutical preparations; the chief form in plant matter.

pyridoxine

One of the B6 group of vitamins. The drug is on the WHO official list.

pyridoxine (B6 )

a water-soluble vitamin of the B-COMPLEX found in fresh meat, eggs, liver, fresh vegetables and whole grains. The vitamin acts as a coenzyme in AMINO ACID metabolism from carbohydrates, a deficiency of which causes dermatitis and, sometimes, motor impairment.

pyridoxine,

n See vitamin B6.

pyridoxine

one of the forms of vitamin B6, chiefly used, as the hydrochloride salt, in the prophylaxis and treatment of vitamin B6 deficiency. Nutritional deficiency is not known to occur under natural conditions in animals. Called also pyridoxal, adermin.