gemination

(redirected from Double consonant)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal, Wikipedia.

gem·i·na·tion

(jem'i-nā'shŭn),
Embryologic partial division of a primordium. For example, gemination of a single tooth germ results in two partially or completely separated crowns on a single root.
[L. geminatio, a doubling]

gemination

in dentistry, the "twinning" of a single tooth bud. Geminated teeth usually have a single common root, a common pulp canal, and visible partial cleavage of the enamel crown. The normal quantity of teeth are present in the dental arch. Not to be confused with fusion.

gem·i·na·tion

(jem'i-nā'shŭn)
Embryologic partial division of a primordium. For example, gemination of a single tooth germ results in two partially or completely separated crowns on a single root.
[L. geminatio, a doubling]

gem·i·na·tion

(jem'i-nā'shŭn)
Embryologic partial division of a primordium. For example, gemination of a single tooth germ results in two partially or completely separated crowns on a single root.
[L. geminatio, a doubling]

gemination (jem´ənā´shən),

n the formation of two teeth from a single tooth germ.

gemination

the abnormal tooth formation as a result of an unsuccessful attempt at forming two separate teeth. There is usually a longitudinal groove.
References in periodicals archive ?
Following earlier studies, Eilers (1907: 4) obviously argues that double consonant graphemes in MS Junius 1 usually mark short vowels.
In the literature on the orthography of The Ormulum, the function of double consonant graphemes is quite often reconstructed on the basis of the presumed output of such sound changes as OSL and HCL.
Similarly to the previous theory, the interpretation advocated by McKnight (1899: 456), who says that "Orm used double consonant to indicate long consonant even in closed syllable", also gained many supporters.
Some of those who claim that Orm indicated vowel length with double consonant graphemes often remark that the rise of this function was possible due to the loss of geminate (long) consonants (cf.
The sporadic use of <CC> digraphs in non-etymological environments in the analysed Late Old English MSS obviously throws into question the "idiosyncratic" status of double consonant graphemes in MS Junius 1, and shows that the use of <CC> digraphs as indicators of vowel shortness is deeply rooted in (Late) Old English scribal tradition.
The fact that the use of double consonant graphemes as markers of vowel length is usually associated with the orthographic system preserved in MS Junius 1 clearly shows that the evidence from Old English MSS has never been given serious consideration.
1; Fulk 1996: 498, 502, and 1998; Brunner 1965: [section]5), and most of them concur that double consonant graphemes were sometimes employed by Old English scribes to indicate vowel shortness.
Her coach hammers away at the double consonants essential to good Italian diction, to say nothing of the open or closed E and O vowels.