double-blind study

(redirected from Double blind study)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Wikipedia.
Related to Double blind study: Double Dummy Study, Randomized controlled trial, triple blind study

dou·ble-blind stud·y

a study in which neither the patients, the experimenter, nor any other assessor of the results, knows which participants are subject to which procedure, thus helping to ensure any biases or expectations will not influence results.
See also: double-blind experiment.

double-blind study

an experiment designed to test the effect of a treatment or substance by using groups of experimental and control subjects in which neither the subjects nor the investigators know which treatment or substance is being administered to which group. In a double-blind test of a new drug, the substance may be identified to the investigators by only a code. The purpose of a double-blind study is to eliminate the risk of prejudgment by the participants, which could distort the results. A double-blind study may be augmented by a cross-over experiment, in which experimental subjects unknowingly become control subjects, and vice versa, at some point in the study. See also placebo.

double-blind study

A study in which neither the subject nor the investigator nor the research team interacting with the subject or data during the trial knows what treatment a subject is receiving (e.g., active or placebo).

double-blind study

comparison of the effect of a drug or other intervention in a group of subjects with that of a placebo (an inactive 'fake' substance or procedure) in a second similar group, when neither those taking part as subjects nor the investigators observing the effects are aware of the group to which any subject has been allocated, until after completion of the study.

double-blind study

design of research study using active and placebo interventions, where neither the experimenter nor the subject is aware which is the true intervention

double-blind study,

n experimental technique in clinical research in which neither the researcher nor the patient knows whether the treatment administered is considered inactive (placebo) or active (medicinal).

dou·ble-blind stud·y

(dŭbĕl-blind stŭdē)
Study in which neither the patients, the experimenter, nor any other assessor of the results, knows which participants are subject to which procedure, thus helping to ensure that any biases or expectations will not influence results.

double-blind study

a study of the effects of a specific agent in which neither the administrator nor the recipient, at the time of administration, knows whether the active or an inert substance is given.
References in periodicals archive ?
One hundred and sixteen autoworkers who were unable to perform at their jobs due to the debilitating effects of CTS took part in the double blind study.
Barkin continued, "A new three-year, double blind study presented at the 6th International Congress of Parkinson's Disease and Movement Disorders compared the effects of pergolide monotherapy and levodopa monotherapy.
Columbia Laboratories (AMEX: COB) today announced that its phase III multi-center, randomized, placebo controlled double blind study of Advantage-S in women at high risk of HIV infection failed to demonstrate that the product could prevent the transmission of the HIV virus.
Columbia Laboratories (AMEX:COB) today announced that patient enrollment had been completed and final patient visits initiated in the phase III multi-center, randomized, placebo controlled double blind study of Advantage-S(r) in women at high risk of HIV infection.
An additional double blind study showed an increase in cellular hydration and a reduction in oxidative stress.
The randomized, double blind study will compare BioHy with the current lead commercial product in the European viscoelastic market for osteoarthritis of the knee.
The prospective, randomized, double blind study will assess the safety and effectiveness of ORTHOVISC in comparison to a saline control.