Doppler color flow

Dopp·ler color flow

(dop'lĕr),
a computer-generated color image produced by Doppler ultrasonography in which different directions of flow are represented by different velocities and directions. See: Doppler ultrasonography.

Doppler color flow

[dop′lər]
Etymology: Christian J. Doppler, Austrian physicist and mathematician, 1803-1853
an ultrasonic technique for detecting anatomical details by color coding of velocity shifts. In cardiography blood flowing in one direction appears red, and blood flowing in the opposite direction appears blue. The technique can also indicate the velocity of red blood corpuscles moving through the circulatory system, which makes it possible to quantify the flow, measure the pressures within the heart chambers, and calculate the stroke volume. In laparoscopy, Doppler color flow allows for rapid identification and differentiation of ducts and valves in the viscera, particularly in detection and diagnosis of pancreatic and liver tumors and colorectal liver metastases. See also Doppler ultrasonography.
enlarge picture
Image produced by Doppler color flow

Dopp·ler co·lor flow

(dop'lĕr kŭl'ŏr flō)
A computer-generated color image produced by Doppler ultrasonography in which different directions of flow are represented by different hues.
See: Doppler ultrasonography
References in periodicals archive ?
Life Line Screenings use Doppler color flow ultrasound to quickly detect arterial abnormalities that can cause disrupted blood flow.
Two Doppler color flow signs that also predicted placenta accreta were areas of turbulent or complicated blood flow at the uteroplacental interface, and irregular blood flow underlying the maternal urinary bladder, he said in a poster presentation.