Don Juan

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Don Juan

(don-hwahn'),
In psychiatry, a term used to denote men with compulsive sexual or romantic overactivity, usually with a succession of female partners.
[legendary Spanish nobleman]

Don Juan

a legendary Spanish libertine cited in many works of literature as a seductive and sexually promiscuous man. See also satyriasis.

Don Juan

(don-hwahn', don jū'an)
psychiatry A term used to denote a man with compulsive sexual or romantic overactivity, usually with a succession of female partners.
[legendary Spanish nobleman]

Don Juan

[After the legendary, promiscuous Spanish nobleman, Don Juan de Tenorio]
A man who behaves in a sexually promiscuous manner. Some psychologists suggest this arises from insecurity concerning his masculinity or latent and unconscious homosexual preference.
References in periodicals archive ?
In the wake of modernism and taking as starting point the features which the character bears at the turn of the century--old age, paternity, repentance, melancholy--Valle-Inclan creates a decadent Don Juan in whom there are hardly any traces of the baroque burlador.
Valle-Inclan himself states that, in the figure of Don Juan Manuel de Montenegro, he aims to renew "the Galician aspects to be found in the Don Juan legend.
There is a third thematic line which develops the Don Juan myth in the twentieth century and so in almost all literary genres: that of parody and farcical imitations.
Despite the work's brevity and beneath its apparent simplicity, it is not difficult to find an important number of traditional Don Juan characteristics which reveal not only the author's knowledge of this centuries-old myth, but also highly self-reflexive discursive construction, whereby the mythical nature is maintained.
However, they are all subject to his overwhelming imagination and to his knowledge of the Don Juan tradition.
The monkish narrator describes a reserved, mature, almost magical incarnation of Don Juan in the seven days before his arrival at Port Royal.
These scenes contrast with the moment when Don Juan himself is a voyeur, observing the motorcycle couple in the woods, peering almost unwillingly at the mechanics of purely physical union, since these people are truly strangers to him.
Malcolm Kelsall briefly observes that passages in Don Juan such as 8.
Don Juan does not focus on a labor-based class struggle; we are never taken inside a factory, or onto a plantation raising crops for export to the core powers (a major element in Immanuel Wallerstein's globalized model of capitalism).
Don Juan was itself a commodity, an element in global trade, and for Byron joining the Greek struggle represented a more authentic way of rocking the markets of tyrants to their foundation.
We can begin with canto 12, the economic heart of Don Juan.
In Don Juan the paper credit of the bond market is merged with accumulation in general, and identified as supporting the "Conspiracy or congress to be made--/ Cobbling at manacles for all mankind" (Dedication 14).