dominant

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dominant

 [dom´ĭ-nant]
1. exerting a ruling or controlling influence.
2. in genetics, capable of expression when carried by only one of a pair of homologous chromosomes; see dominant gene.
3. an allele or trait that has this characteristic.
dominant side the half of the body in which a person is stronger; writing and eating are usually done with the hand on the dominant side. See also handedness.

dom·i·nant

(dom'i-nănt),
1. Ruling or controlling.
2. In genetics, denoting an allele possessed by one of the parents of a hybrid that is expressed in the latter to the exclusion of a contrasting allele (the recessive) from the other parent.
[L. dominans, pres. p. of dominor, to rule, fr. dominus, lord, master, fr. domus, house]

dominant

/dom·i·nant/ (dom´ĭ-nant)
1. exerting a ruling or controlling influence.
2. in genetics, capable of expression when carried by only one of a pair of homologous chromosomes.
3. a dominant allele or trait.

dominant

(dŏm′ə-nənt)
adj.
1. Tending to be stronger than its counterpart or used for the most important tasks or in the most pressing situations: Which is your dominant eye? Throw the ball with your dominant arm.
2. Genetics Of, relating to, or being an allele that produces the same phenotypic effect in heterozygotes as in homozygotes.
3. Ecology Of, relating to, or being a species that is most characteristic of an ecological community and usually determines the presence, abundance, and type of other species.
n.
1. Genetics A dominant allele or a trait produced by a dominant allele.
2. Ecology A dominant species.

dom′i·nant·ly adv.

dominant

[dom′inənt]
Etymology: L, dominari, to rule
1 exerting a ruling or controlling influence.
2 in genetics, capable of expression when carried by only one of a pair of homologous chromosomes.
3 in coronary artery anatomy, supplying the posterior diaphragmatic part of the interventricular septum and the diaphragmatic surface of the left ventricle; said of the right and left coronary arteries.

dominant

Genetics
noun A phenotype expressed when a particular gene is present in a cell, regardless of whether the allelic set contains 2 different forms of expression; the allele with the masked phenotype is termed recessive.
 
Autosomal dominant disorders
Achondroplasia, familial hypercholesterolemia, Huntington’s disease.

Sexology
adjective, noun Top; Referring to the person, or the person him- or herself, who takes the active or controlling role in a BDSM relationship, which contrasts to the submissive (bottom) position or role.

dominant

Genetics A phenotype expressed when a particular gene is present in a cell, regardless of whether the allelic set contains 2 different forms of expression; the allele with the masked phenotype is termed recessive Dominant disorders Achondroplasia, familial hypercholesterolemia, Huntington's disease. See Filial generation, Homozygote, Trait. Cf Recessive.

dom·i·nant

(dom'i-nănt)
1. Ruling or controlling.
2. genetics Denoting an allele possessed by one of the parents of a hybrid that is expressed in the latter to the exclusion of a contrasting allele (the recessive) from the other parent.
[L. dominans, pres. p. of dominor, to rule, fr. dominus, lord, master, fr. domus, house]

dominant

See DOMINANCE.

dominant

1. exerting a ruling or controlling influence; in genetics, capable of expression when carried by only one of a pair of homologous chromosomes.
2. a dominant allele or trait. If a defect, appearance in all heterozygotes and homozygotes tends toward the trait being self-limiting because of culling or death. See also gene, dominance.

dominant X-linked inheritance
References in periodicals archive ?
To better understand the behavioral patterns that promote rank reversals, we performed preliminary data analysis, quantifying aggressive and submissive acts displayed by dominants and subordinates in trials that did or did not lead to rank reversals (Table 1).
Instead, for rank reversals to occur, the intruder has to be larger than both members of the original pair, which gives the intruder an agonistic advantage leading to defeats of both the dominants and subordinates.
Thus, the observed losses of some subordinates to smaller intruders could be a consequence of the previous losing experience (to the dominant); since not all subordinates lost to the smaller intruder, however, differences in individual fighting success were likely influenced by the behavior of the dominants toward the subordinates during the intruder period.
Thus, subordinates that are present during the defeat of the dominants have ample opportunity to collect information related to the dominants' degradation, which may empower them to challenge the dominants in subsequent fights.
We never observed dominants defeating larger intruders in the presence of subordinates; and some dominants lost fights against same-sized intruders under these conditions, which must have eliminated any advantage from the previous win.
However, in our last experiment, when we transferred the original pairs into new tanks for the intruder period, dominance indices of dominants and subordinates (measured against each other) were no longer significantly different.
Rank reversals are signified by a reduction in aggression and an increase in submission by the original dominants, and by the opposite behavioral pattern in the original subordinates during P2.
722 Average number [+ or -] standard deviation of aggressive (attack, approach) and submissive (escape, retreat) behavioral acts produced by dominants (DOM) and subordinates (SUB) during the intruder period in trials that remained stable (Non-REV) and in trials that later (in Phase 3 (P3)) reversed (REV).
Competition often entails dyadic aggressive interactions, from which one animal emerges as the dominant and one as the subordinate.
This sudden change in agonistic behavior signifies the formation of the dominance relationship, and identifies the newly emerged subordinate and dominant (Herberholz et al.