domesticate

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domesticate

(də-mĕs′tĭ-kāt′)
tr.v. domesti·cated, domesti·cating, domesti·cates
a. To train or adapt (an animal or plant) to live in a human environment and be of use to humans.
b. To introduce and accustom (an animal or plant) into another region; naturalize.
n. (-kət, -kāt′)
A plant or animal that has been adapted to live in a human environment.

do·mes′ti·ca′tion n.
References in periodicals archive ?
According to Weaver-Zercher, Americans have long seen the Amish as morally superior, but that designation comes at a heavy price for the Amish, for we find that American domesticators have been intensely critical of the Amish when they falter.
We are domesticators, only able to abide nature if it inhabits our domain, yet for that nature which follows our rules, we have only disdain.
So if we look, for example, at those who practiced domestication and/or were in contact with domesticators and civilizers, shorter lives are indeed in the picture.
Early domesticators would use every part, including their bones, teeth and hooves.
That's some 5,000 years before the earliest cat burials in Egypt, and Vigne has argued that Egyptians probably weren't the original domesticators of F.
The role of Khmer monks as domesticators of potentially dangerous spirits, such as the bray spirits of those who died a violent death, (25) or the tutelary neak ta, (26) has already been noted as has Buddhism's role in harnessing power for the sustenance and welfare of the Khmer universe.