horse

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horse

(hôrs)
n.
a. A large hoofed mammal (Equus caballus) having a short coat, a long mane, and a long tail, domesticated since ancient times and used for riding and for drawing or carrying loads.
b. An adult male horse; a stallion.
c. Any of various equine mammals, such as the wild Asian species Przewalski's horse or certain extinct forms related ancestrally to the modern horse.
v.intr.
To be in heat. Used of a mare.
adj.
1. Of or relating to a horse: a horse blanket.
2. Mounted on horses: horse guards.
3. Drawn or operated by a horse.
Drug slang A regional term for heroin
Infectious disease A hoofed ungulate mammal—Equus ferus caballus—that may be associated with certain infections through occupational or recreational exposure—e.g., Actinobacillus spp, anthrax, brucellosis, cryptosporidiosis, equine morbillivirus, glanders, leptospirosis, rabies, salmonellosis, yersiniosis
Psychology See Equestrian therapy, Hippotherapy
References in periodicals archive ?
Horse remains found at four Botai sites include two telltale signs of domestication: slender lower-leg bones like those of later domesticated horses and cheek teeth worn down by bits that attached to bridles or similar restraints, reports a team led by Alan Outram of the University of Exeter in England.
These practices were probably borrowed from inhabitants of the nearby Russian steppes who may have included domesticated horses in sacrificial rituals with domesticated sheep and cattle by 6,500 years ago.
Stephanie Pierce of Pahrump established Miracle Horse Rescue to preserve and care for abused, neglected and unwanted domesticated horses.
While western zoologists might debate Bibikova's methods for identifying domesticated horses, her ability to distinguish antelope from sheep can hardly be doubted.
In their own studies, Anthony and Brown obtained casts of premolar teeth from domesticated horses ridden with metal bits and from a small group of wild horses, most of which had been illegally killed by Nevada cattle ranchers and were provided to the researchers by state officials.