horse

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horse

(hôrs)
n.
a. A large hoofed mammal (Equus caballus) having a short coat, a long mane, and a long tail, domesticated since ancient times and used for riding and for drawing or carrying loads.
b. An adult male horse; a stallion.
c. Any of various equine mammals, such as the wild Asian species Przewalski's horse or certain extinct forms related ancestrally to the modern horse.
v.intr.
To be in heat. Used of a mare.
adj.
1. Of or relating to a horse: a horse blanket.
2. Mounted on horses: horse guards.
3. Drawn or operated by a horse.
Drug slang A regional term for heroin
Infectious disease A hoofed ungulate mammal—Equus ferus caballus—that may be associated with certain infections through occupational or recreational exposure—e.g., Actinobacillus spp, anthrax, brucellosis, cryptosporidiosis, equine morbillivirus, glanders, leptospirosis, rabies, salmonellosis, yersiniosis
Psychology See Equestrian therapy, Hippotherapy
References in periodicals archive ?
Our research clearly shows that the original founder population of domestic horses was established in the western Eurasian Steppe, an area where the earliest archaeological evidence for domesticated horses has been found," said Dr Vera Warmuth, from the University of Cambridge's Department of Zoology.
They're smaller and leaner than our barn-fed domesticated horses, and they move more spryly and with more spirit.
When "Man's" manly Grylls appeared on David Letterman's show recently, the latenight host asked about the staging allegations but--despite joking about how domesticated horses that Grylls rode in one episode were "ex-wild horses"--went out of his way to apologize for him.
The first of these domesticated horses were likely still used for meat and for the female horses' vitamin-rich milk.
In addition, they are trying to prevent free-roaming domesticated horses from mating with the wild horses, as this would reduce the number of pure takhi left in the world.
More frequently drawings have been found of other large herbivores, which were abundant in Europe at that time, but which are now rare or already extinct, such as bison (only to be found today as a few populations in Poland and Byelorussia, and in zoos), horses (apart from domesticated horses, only a few groups of these survive in Mongolia), bulls (of which only domesticated breeds survive), and deer (it would appear that the giant deer Megaloceros giganteus, which is probably the animal depicted by the Magdalenian painters, became extinct during the Middle Ages in Ireland, where it had taken final refuge).
All odd-toed ungulates other than domesticated horses, including zebra, rhinoceros, and tapir.