domain

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do·main

(dō-mān'),
1. Homologous unit of approximately 110-120 amino acids, groups of which make up the light and heavy chains of the immunoglobulin molecule; each serves a specific function. The light chain has two domains, one in the variable region and one in the constant region of the chain; the heavy chain has four to five domains, depending on the class of immunoglobulin, one in the variable region and the remaining ones in the constant region.
2. A region of a protein having some distinctive physical feature or role.
3. An independently folded, globular structure composed of one section of a polypeptide chain. A domain may interact with another domain; it may be associated with a particular function. Domains can vary in size.
[Fr. domaine, fr. L. dominium, property, dominion]

domain

/do·main/ (do-mān´) in immunology, any of the homology regions of heavy or light polypeptide chains of immunoglobulins.

domain

(dō-mān′)
n.
Biology Any of three primary divisions of organisms, consisting of the eukaryotes, bacteria, and archaea, that rank above a kingdom in taxonomic systems based on similarities of DNA sequences.

domain

a region of a protein or polypeptide whose three-dimensional configuration enables it to interact specifically with particular receptors, enzymes, or other proteins.

domain

EBM
Any of a collection of observations with a topic-specific commonality about each subject in a clinical trial, which the Clinical Data Interchange Standards Consortium (CDISC) divides into different classes:
• Interventions class;
• Events class;
• Findings class.

do·main

(dō-mān')
1. Homologous unit of 110-120 amino acids, groups of which make up the light and heavy chains of the immunoglobulin molecule; each serves a specific function. The light chain has two domains, one in the variable region and one in the constant region of the chain; the heavy chain has four to five domains, depending on the class of immunoglobulin, one in the variable region and the remaining ones in the constant region.
2. A region of a protein having some distinctive physical feature or role.
3. An independently folded, globular structure composed of one section of a polypeptide chain. A domain may interact with another domain; it may be associated with a particular function. Domains can vary in size.
[Fr. domaine, fr. L. dominium, property, dominion]

domain

1. Of a protein, a discrete length of the amino acid sequence that is known to be associated with a specific function.
2. Of a chromosome, a region in which supercoiling occurs independently of other domains; or a region that includes a gene of raised sensitivity to degradation by DNASE I.

domain

  1. a structurally or functionally distinct part of a PROTEIN.
  2. any of three primary groupings (‘superkingdoms’): ARCHAEA, BACTERIA or EUCARYA, into which all ORGANISMS are placed in modern CLASSIFICATIONS based on genetic structures and sequences.

domain

1. region of a protein with a characteristic tertiary structure and function; homologous domains may occur on different proteins.
2. regions of the heavy chain of immunoglobulins. See cH domain, cL domain.

transmembrane domain
for any membrane-bound protein or glycoprotein, those amino acid sequences that traverse and are present in the cell membrane. In receptor biology, transmembrane domains are distinguished from the extracellular ligand binding domains, cytoplasmic domains, and from immunological domains.

Patient discussion about domain

Q. What other illnesses are similar to asthma? I am 45 years old. My doctor suspects I might have adult asthma but there has yet been a final diagnosis made. What other problems might this be?

A. Before diagnosing someone as asthmatic, alternative possibilities should be considered. A clinician taking a history should check whether the patient is using any known bronchoconstrictors (substances that cause narrowing of the airways, e.g., certain anti-inflammatory agents or beta-blockers). Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, which closely resembles asthma, is correlated with more exposure to cigarette smoke, an older patient, and decreased likelihood of family history of atopy. Your physician should examine these possibilities as well before diagnosing.

More discussions about domain
References in classic literature ?
But within the present boundaries of my domain there are now none left that I know of, for I am sure we should have heard indirectly of any great Mahar city that had escaped us, although of course the imperial army has by no means covered the vast area which I now rule.
Thus it was he learned the law, and ere he left the domain of the chickens, he had learned to ignore their existence.
King Bud of Noland and his dainty fair-haired sister, the Princess Fluff, were friends of Zixi, as their kingdoms were adjoining, so they had traveled together from their far-off domains to do honor to Ozma of Oz on the occasion of her birthday.
In those branches of administration which the king did not himself direct, such for instance as the "fermes" (the public domains throughout the country on which a revenue was levied), the clerks were to their superior what the clerks of a business-house are to their employer; they learned a science which would one day advance them to prosperity.
The youth had now journeyed considerably beyond the furthest domains of the Abbey.
The old abbey flourished then; and the five sisters, living on its fair domains, paid yearly dues to the black monks of St Benedict, to which fraternity it belonged.
Small spirits and spacious souls had those shepherds: but, my brethren, what small domains have even the most spacious souls hitherto been!
It is not much of a dream, considering the vast extent of the domains of dreamland, and their wonderful productions; it is only remarkable for being unusually restless and unusually real.
All their efforts would have proved fruitless, however, against the living torrent, had not Asinus, whose domains had just been so rudely entered, lifted his voice, in the midst of the uproar.
Toward sunset we entered a beautiful green valley dotted with chalets, a cozy little domain hidden away from the busy world in a cloistered nook among giant precipices topped with snowy peaks that seemed to float like islands above the curling surf of the sea of vapor that severed them from the lower world.
However, in their relief at leaving a domain where that tyrannical shade held sway, they had hesitated until the last moment to tell us this curious story, which our skeptical minds were certainly not prepared to entertain.
No sooner had the Fairy reached her own domain than she made herself visible, and turning to the Prince she told him that unless he obeyed all her commands down to the minutest detail he would be severely punished.