anamnesis

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anamnesis

 [an″am-ne´sis] (Gr.)
1. recollection.
2. a medical or psychiatric patient case history, particularly using the patient's recollections. Compare catamnesis.

an·am·ne·sis

(an'am-nē'sis),
1. The act of remembering.
2. The medical or developmental history of a patient.
[G. anamnēsis, recollection]

anamnesis

/an·am·ne·sis/ (an″am-ne´sis) [Gr.]
1. recollection.
2. a patient case history, particularly using the patient's recollections.

anamnesis

[an′amnē′sis]
Etymology: Gk, anamimneskein, to recall
1 remembrance of the past.
2 the accumulated data concerning a medical or psychiatric patient and the patient's background, including family, previous environment, experiences, and particularly, recollections, for use in analyzing his or her condition. Compare catamnesis.

an·am·ne·sis

(an'am-nē'sis)
1. The act of remembering.
2. The medical or developmental history of a patient.
[G. anamnēsis, recollection]

anamnesis

The complete clinical case history of a patient. From the Greek anamnesis , a reminiscence.

an·am·ne·sis

(an'am-nē'sis)
1. The act of remembering.
2. The medical or developmental history of a patient.
[G. anamnēsis, recollection]

anamnesis (an´amnē´sis),

n a history of disease or injury based on the patient's memory or recall at the time of dental and/or medical interview and examination.

anamnesis

1. the faculty of memory.
2. the history of a patient and its relatives.
References in periodicals archive ?
Now, the purpose of this paper is to discuss quite different line of argument which I think Plato also deploys to address the learner's paradox, rather than to review the voluminous literature on "recollection," or even discuss the problem with the doctrine of recollection as a solution to Meno's paradox.
The answer to this question requires a closer look at the Platonic doctrine of recollection.
Helmig's presentation of ancient and modern readings of Phaedrus 249b-c to determine the place of abstraction and conception in Plato's analyses, which the author initially considers as implied in his doctrine of recollection and the attainment of common features from a manifold of individuals (pp.

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