creationism

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creationism

(krē-ā′shə-nĭz′əm)
n.
Belief in the supernatural origin of the universe or of humans and other living things, especially as based on the literal interpretation of the account of the creation related in the Bible.

cre·a′tion·ist adj. & n.

creationism

Evolutionary biology
A philosophy based on the Judeo-Christian concept that all forms of life, in particular human life, were created from nothing (by God). Creationism is the virtual opposite of Darwinism or evolution, in which all organisms are believed to have evolved from another.

creationism

The belief that the account of the creation of the world contained in the first chapter of the book of Genesis is literally true. The implication, often expressed, is that the scientific account, including the geological evidence, is false. Creationism denies Darwinian evolution, but a belief in, and knowledge of, evolution has become an essential component in the mental armamentarium of the medical scientist. (See EVOLUTIONARY MEDICINE.)

creationism

an old-fashioned and outdated doctrine that each species of organism arose in an independent fashion by special creation. Such views have now been largely replaced by evolutionary theory but are still held by some on religious grounds.
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Second, a theology of thriving informed by a robust doctrine of creation stresses God's providence within the created realm.
The religious doctrine of creation does not negate human freedom but precisely releases it from the false gods that too often actually rule the world.
His main focus is a theological anthropology, which he develops while discussing traditional theological themes such as the doctrine of the Trinity, Christology, and the doctrine of creation.
Unlike most recent books on Science and Religion, which either discuss the relationship between the two subjects in general terms, or concentrate on one particular aspect of that relationship -- for instance, the theological doctrine of Creation and the scientific theory of the Big Bang -- this book is far more detailed.
develops, two stand out as most important: first, that the Christian doctrine of creation offers a perspective on human passivity "more profound" (52) than Heidegger's perspective; second, that "the ethical claim of the other" (131) is phenomenologically more primordial than Heidegger believes (leading P.
If the metaphysical idea of creation simply demarcates a certain kind of causality--the production of a thing into being according to its entire substance, such that the product is dependent on its cause for its continued existence--which can be separated from the question of the manner in which the cause acts--whether by necessity or choice, or through created instruments or directly--then Plotinus presents a philosophical account of creation, (157) and Aquinas, insofar as he follows the Late Antique and Arabic practice of attributing to Plato and Aristotle the doctrines of their followers (Plotinus and the Neoplatonists), is correct to attribute to the Greek philosophers the doctrine of creation.
This metaphor has the potential to inspire us to go beyond the anthropocentric doctrine of creation of dominion and stewardship to an ecological doctrine of creation.
32) Biological evolution is consistent with the doctrine of creation in this view.
I hope to show that the doctrine of creation best accounts for and makes sense of the situation found today between departments of science and departments of philosophy and theology: a historically diverging but essentially complementary relationship between ancient and modern science.
Specifically, I evaluate and critique Virgilio Elizondo's contribution to the Christian doctrine of Creation in Guadalupe: Mother of the New Creation (1997), in such a way that Reformed/Calvinist Protestants might come to appreciate the strong christological focus and profound doctrinal insights of Elizondo's interpretation of the Guadalupe narrative.
Ultimately, the doctrine of creation from primeval chaos is inadequate because it posits two primordial realities.
Christian theologians have, unfortunately, responded by shifting their primary attention away from the doctrine of Creation and to the doctrine of Redemption and its various components, crucifixion, human sin, and restoration.