optometry

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optometry

 [op-tom´ĕ-tre]
the professional practice of eye and vision care for the diagnosis, treatment, and prevention of diseases and conditions of the eye and visual system. See optometrist.

op·tom·e·try

(op-tom'ĕ-trē),
1. The profession concerned with the examination of the eyes and related structures to determine the presence of vision problems and eye disorders and with the prescription and adaptation of lenses and other optical aids or the use of visual training for maximum visual efficiency.
2. The use of an optometer.

optometry

/op·tom·e·try/ (op-tom´ĕ-tre) the professional practice consisting of examination of the eyes to evaluate health and visual abilities, diagnosis of eye diseases and conditions of the eye and visual system, and provision of necessary treatment by the use of eyeglasses, contact lenses, and other functional, optical, surgical, and pharmaceutical means as regulated by state law.

optometry

(ŏp-tŏm′ĭ-trē)
n.
The practice or profession of an optometrist.

op′to·met′ric (ŏp′tə-mĕt′rĭk), op′to·met′ri·cal (-rĭ-kəl) adj.

optometry

[optom′ətrē]
Etymology: Gk, optikos, sight, metron, measure
the practice of primary eye care, including testing the eyes for visual acuity, prescribing corrective spectacles or contact lenses and topical medications, and managing binocular vision disorders. See also optician.

op·tom·e·try

(op-tom'ĕ-trē)
1. The profession concerned with the examination of the eyes and related structures to determine the presence of vision problems and eye disorders, and with the prescription and adaptation of lenses and other optic aids or the use of visual training for maximum visual efficiency.
2. The use of an optometer.

optometry 

An autonomous, healthcare profession involved in the services and care of the eye and visual system, and the enhancement of visual performance. Syn. ophthalmic optics (term used principally in the UK and the Republic of Ireland). See primary care optometry.
behavioural optometry A branch of optometry concerned with the diagnosis and treatment of visual problems taking into account not only the ocular history, signs and symptoms but also the whole person and his or her environment.
experimental optometry The branch of optometry concerned with the scientific investigation of optometric problems by experimentation upon humans or animals, or by clinical research. See psychophysics.
geriatric optometry A branch of optometry concerned with the prevention, diagnosis and treatment of visual problems in old age.
paediatric optometry A branch of optometry concerned with the prevention, development, diagnosis and treatment of visual problems in children.
primary care optometry Term referring to the basic field of optometry to which patients usually come directly and are not usually referred by other professionals. Primary care optometric practitioners may refer some of their patients to other practitioners such as ophthalmologists, neurologists or to other optometric specialists for specialized services such as paediatric optometry, low vision aids or highly specialized aspects of contact lens fitting.

op·tom·e·try

(op-tom'ĕ-trē)
The profession concerned with the examination of the eyes and related structures to determine the presence of vision problems and eye disorders, and with the prescription and adaptation of lenses and other optic aids or the use of visual training for maximum visual efficiency.

optometry (optom´itrē),

n the professional discipline devoted to testing the eyes for visual acuity, prescribing corrective lenses, and recommending eye exercises and other health practices to preserve sight.
References in periodicals archive ?
In addition to sharing findings with the parents, the doctor of optometry may send summary information to the infant's pediatrician, family physician or other appropriate practitioners to report and explain any significant condition(s) or concerns diagnosed in the assessment.
Berman, Doctor of Optometry and co-director of the Institute for Sports Vision in Ridgefield, Conn.
However, only 32 percent of adults who do not wear glasses or contacts, have seen a doctor of optometry in the past two years.
27 /PRNewswire/ -- North Carolina students interested in earning the doctor of optometry degree are encouraged to attend the 2007 Contract Programs Career Conferences on Optometry sponsored by the N.
North Carolina provides funding for residents of the state pursuing doctor of optometry degrees at four out of state campuses through the North Carolina Optometry Scholarship Loan (OSL) program.
Davis graduated from the University of Iowa and received his Doctor of Optometry degree from the Illinois College of Optometry.
Since vision changes can occur without a parent or child noticing them, children should visit a doctor of optometry at least every two years, or more frequently, if specific problems or risk factors exist.
R-AR), the only doctor of optometry serving in Congress, has sponsored a companion bill (H.

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