atman

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atman

[ät′män]
(in psychiatry) a concept derived from Eastern Indian philosophy that the highest value is knowledge of one's true self. The atman represents the most inward reality, the innermost spirit, and the highest controlling power of a person.

atman

Paranormal
The understanding of self—in the Hindu construct—as a means of attaining liberation and divine perfection.

atman (ätˑ·mn),

n according to Vedic tradition, the “self” or the “individual soul.” Unification of atman with Brahman leads to enlightenment of an individual. Also called
atma. See also Brahman.
References in periodicals archive ?
During one of his visits to the temple before the yagna, after an hour-long meditation on the huge rock at the temple there he had spontaneously said that a divine soul would alone realize the divinity of this place.
One might further object that, setting aside the Phaedrus, it seems inapt to view divine soul as partite (see R 611b5-7); much of Plato's analysis of virtue, however, treats it as the harmonization of the parts of the soul.
But this creates problems for his Christology, since on his metaphysics, whether it be a human or a divine soul, each is already an individual.
For these limitations are now in some sense within the divine soul, and while it is relatively easy to comprehend a blocking mechanism between two different entities (divine and human soul) or even within a single finite, fallible entity (the human mind), what are we to make of conflict within a single divine soul?
But if the alternative is belief in a divine soul that by definition cannot be understood, then surely the human race must abandon hope of saving itself, not from perdition but from extinction.
This duality corresponds to the duality expressed by the Tanya between the divine soul and the animal soul.
In the Phaedo, then, Socrates indicates, albeit quietly, that, in his view, the philosophical life is the best way of life, not because of the rewards the divine soul of the philosopher will enjoy in Hades, but rather because of the happiness the philosopher enjoys, as a human being, in this life" (p.
Indeed, says Rabbi Shneur Zalman, "In its essence and substance, the divine soul in the benoni has no preponderance over the animal soul, except at the time when his love for G-d manifests itself in his heart on propitious occasions, such as [during] prayer and the like.
Equally, though, the benoni must be constantly aware of the crucial importance of always maintaining the divine soul to control the 'small city' of a human being.
Following the traditional Jewish view that a human is invested with an animal soul and a divine soul, the Ramhal describes the animal soul as including a person's imagination, memory, intelligence, and will.
Alter Rebbe A person has a divine soul and an animal soul, struggling with one another for dominance.
Instead, "they constitute a multitude of divine souls, each of whom has the specific task of looking after each part of the sensible world.