atman

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atman

[ät′män]
(in psychiatry) a concept derived from Eastern Indian philosophy that the highest value is knowledge of one's true self. The atman represents the most inward reality, the innermost spirit, and the highest controlling power of a person.

atman

Paranormal
The understanding of self—in the Hindu construct—as a means of attaining liberation and divine perfection.

atman (ätˑ·mn),

n according to Vedic tradition, the “self” or the “individual soul.” Unification of atman with Brahman leads to enlightenment of an individual. Also called
atma. See also Brahman.
References in periodicals archive ?
During one of his visits to the temple before the yagna, after an hour-long meditation on the huge rock at the temple there he had spontaneously said that a divine soul would alone realize the divinity of this place.
One might further object that, setting aside the Phaedrus, it seems inapt to view divine soul as partite (see R 611b5-7); much of Plato's analysis of virtue, however, treats it as the harmonization of the parts of the soul.
is actually absorbed into holiness like the divine soul itself .
Yet, as is clear from Emerson's closing statement in "The American Scholar," his personal vision is strongly connected with a national one: "A nation of men will for the first time exist, because each believes himself inspired by the Divine Soul which also inspires all men" (425).
Here's what Webster's says: ``The living, immortal, eternal and ultimately divine soul in Egyptian religious belief represented as a bird with a human head and believed to leave the body at death and return eventually to revivify the body if it is preserved.
But if the alternative is belief in a divine soul that by definition cannot be understood, then surely the human race must abandon hope of saving itself, not from perdition but from extinction.
Creating and destroying embryos for research purposes is to treat each of these distinct human beings as an object and possession-without moral worth or a divine soul.
In the Phaedo, then, Socrates indicates, albeit quietly, that, in his view, the philosophical life is the best way of life, not because of the rewards the divine soul of the philosopher will enjoy in Hades, but rather because of the happiness the philosopher enjoys, as a human being, in this life" (p.