ditch

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ditch (ditching),

n the undesirable loss of tooth substance in the region of a restoration margin (usually gingival).
References in periodicals archive ?
When Ditcher, the second in command, cannot sleep the night before the attack, he goes outside and seems to hold a conversation with both nature and his wife:
In a revealing story in Yediot Aharonot, it was learned that GSS (General Security Service - Shin/Bet) director Avi Ditcher permitted bodyguards of PA Prime Minister Abu Mazen to enter a meeting with Prime Minister Ariel Sharon while carrying weapons.
Breakthrough project manager David Ditcher says: "The idea of the scanner is to bring our PC based operations onto the shop floor, allowing staff and managers to spend More time on customer care.
Vector Control uses its rotary ditcher to complete the cleaning and retrenching of existing mosquito ditches.
The fugitive Potter's encounter with the ditcher is retained in the novel, but not his observations on the old man's destitution:
Consider the silent influence which flowers exert, no less upon the ditcher in the meadow than the lady in the bower.
Owned by the RSPB, the giant American big wheel rotary ditcher is the only one of its kind in the UK and this is the first time it has been used in the North of England.
Burlington's Deeside plant managing director Andrew Ditcher yesterday declined to comment except to confirm the closure.
According to Lemsip brand manager Sally Ditcher, "consumers have a poor understanding of product ingredients and how they work" and will therefore prefer to choose a brand they know and trust, whatever the price.
Matchwinner Paul Wright was meant for this stage, but the man they call The Ditcher after his knack for last-gasp tackles has had to earn the right to play on it.
Andrew Ditcher, 25, a former JTL apprentice, and Melanie Walton, 20, a final year apprentice, both worked for a local company in Teesside before it became a victim of the recession a year ago, making them redundant.