distortion

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distortion

 [dis-tor´shun]
1. the state of being twisted out of a natural or normal shape or position.
2. in psychology, the process of altering or disguising unconscious ideas or impulses so that they become acceptable to the conscious mind.
3. in optics or radiology, deviation of an image from the true outline or shape of an object or structure; it may be a change in size or shape, an elongation, a foreshortening, or a magnification. See illustration.
A, Barrel distortion; B, pincushion distortion. From Dorland's, 2000.

dis·tor·tion

(dis-tōr'shŭn),
1. psychiatry a defense mechanism that helps to repress or disguise unacceptable thoughts.
2. dentistry permanent deformation of the impression material after the registration of an imprint.
3. A twisting out of normal shape or form.
4. ophthalmology unequal magnification over a field of view.
[L. distortio, fr. dis-torqueo, to wrench apart]

distortion

/dis·tor·tion/ (dis-tor´shun)
1. the state of being twisted out of normal shape or position.
2. in psychiatry, the conversion of material offensive to the superego into acceptable form.
3. deviation of an image from the true outline or shape of an object or structure.
Enlarge picture
(A), Barrel distortion; (B), pincushion distortion.

distortion

(dĭ-stôr′shən)
n.
Psychology The modification of unconscious impulses into forms acceptable by conscious or dreaming perception.

dis·tor′tion·al, dis·tor′tion·ar′y, dis·tor′tive adj.

distortion

[distôr′shən]
Etymology: L, dis + torquere, to twist
1 (in psychology) the process of shifting experience in one's perceptions. Distortions represent personal constructs of truth, validity, and right and wrong. The distortions of patients tend to influence their views of the world and themselves, as by altering a negative perception to one more favorable.
2 (in radiology) radiographic image artifacts that may be caused by variations in the size and shape or position of the object. Thick or curved objects cause greater distortion than thin, flat objects because of unequal magnification.

dis·tor·tion

(dis-tōr'shŭn)
1. psychiatry A defense mechanism that helps to repress or disguise unacceptable thoughts.
2. dentistry The permanent deformation of the impression material after the registration of an imprint.
3. A twisting out of normal shape or form.
4. ophthalmology Unequal magnification over a field of view.
[L. distortio, fr. dis-torqueo, to wrench apart]

distortion

Aberration of an optical system resulting in an image which does not conform to the shape of the object, somewhat resembling the image viewed through a cylindrical lens. This is due to an unequal magnification of the image. Distortion can be barrel-shaped (barrel-shaped distortion) in which the corners of the image of a square are closer to the centre than the middle part of the sides; or pincushion (pincushion distortion) in which the corners of the image of a square are farther from the centre than the middle part of the sides (Fig. D10). Example of barrel-shaped distortion: a square object seen through an uncorrected negative spectacle lens. Example of pincushion distortion: a square object seen through an uncorrected positive spectacle lens. See correction; fisheye lens; sine condition.
Fig. D10 Distortion (O, object; A, pincushion distortion; B, barrel-shaped distortion)enlarge picture
Fig. D10 Distortion (O, object; A, pincushion distortion; B, barrel-shaped distortion)

dis·tor·tion

(dis-tōr'shŭn)
1. In dentistry, permanent deformation of the impression material after the registration of an imprint.
2. A twisting out of normal shape or form.
[L. distortio, fr. dis-torqueo, to wrench apart]

distortion,

n 1. a deviation from the normal shape or condition.
n 2. a modification of the speech sound in some way so that the acoustic result only approximates the standard sound and is not accurate.
n 3. a twisting or deformation. A loss of accuracy in reproduction of cavity form.
distortion, film-fault,
n an imperfection in the size or shape of a film image by either magnification, elongation, or foreshortening.
distortion, horizontal,
n a disproportional change in size and shape of the image in the horizontal plane as a result of oblique horizontal angulation of the radiographic beam.
distortion, magnification,
n a proportional enlargement of a radiographic image. It is always present to some degree in oral radiography but is minimized with extended focal-film distances.
distortion, vertical (foreshortening),
n a disproportional change in size, either elongation or foreshortening, caused by incorrect vertical angulation or improper film placement.

distortion

the state of being twisted out of normal shape or position.

Patient discussion about distortion

Q. what does c4-5 mild central disk bulging impinging upon cervical cord without spinal stenosis or distortion of the cord . mild righ neural foraminal narrowing from uncovertebral joint hypertropy mean

A. Well this basically means there is a very small narrowing of the cervical (your neck area) spinal canal (where the spinal cord is), however the narrowing does not cause any damage to the spinal cord, therefore probably does not cause any major symptoms involving the nerves. The c4-5 bulging part refers to the part in between the two cervical vertebras c4 and c5, in which the disc (a part in the spinal cord) is sliding a bit side-ways, but again, it does not seem to be causing any trouble.

More discussions about distortion
References in periodicals archive ?
Therefore, humans and monkeys may have chosen to view more dot distortions because the novelty was greater when learning the more difficult categories.
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Lacking this primary relationship, boys will, depending on their socio-economic class, either "gather together among themselves" and develop a reactive distortion of masculinity that exults violence, or turn into "wimpy, indecisive" young men.
Indeed, we believe that there are other areas (such as goodwill) where distortions may occur that would benefit from similar rules.
7) In their model, Erceg, Henderson, and Levin assumed the existence of output and employment subsidies that eliminate any distortions arising from the market power of monopolistically competitive firms.
The ITU has also approved an enhanced version of the algorithm, PSQM+, which manages large transient distortions more effectively.
To this end, the author focused her research on the self-reported perceptual and memory distortions experienced by officers involved in shootings.
To test high data rate, high-fidelity digital signal processors in this application, the reference clock must have extremely low random noise and no spurious signals or half-period distortions.
determines the stress distribution and the related strains and distortions during the solidification and cooling of the casting.
One version of the technology inserts distortions into the music that can't be detected on an ordinary CD player.
You see distortions and discontinuities in pictures that are difficult to explain unless optics were used," he says.
In addition to the inevitable distortions listed above, the data structure used to store map coordinate and attribute information adds another dimension to the problem of map projection distortion.