conversion disorder

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conversion

 [kon-ver´zhun]
1. the act of changing into something of different form or properties.
2. an unconscious defense mechanism by which the anxiety that stems from intrapsychic conflict is altered and expressed in a symbolic physical symptom such as pain, paralysis, loss of sight, or some other manifestation that has no organic or physiological basis.
3. manipulative correction of malposition of a fetal part during labor.
conversion disorder a somatoform disorder characterized by symptoms or deficits affecting voluntary motor or sensory functioning and suggesting physical illness but produced by conversion. Called also conversion reaction.

Patients' anxiety is “converted” into any of a variety of somatic symptoms such as blindness, deafness, or paralysis, none of which have any organic basis. The anxiety may be the result of an inner conflict too difficult to face, and symptoms are aggravated in times of psychological stress. Patients often exhibit remarkable lack of concern, called la belle indifférence, about their symptoms, no matter how serious.

From their symptoms, patients achieve both the primary gain of relief from their anxiety and a number of secondary gains such as support and attention from others and the chance to avoid unpleasant responsibilities. Symptoms are often increased at times of psychological stress. The symptoms often have an important symbolic relationship to the patient's unconscious conflict, such as incapacitating illness in those who cannot acknowledge dependency needs. Symptoms are neither intentionally produced nor feigned, are not limited to pain or sexual dysfunction, and may affect a part of the body the patient considers weak. One of the first observed examples of conversion disorder was combat fatigue, in which soldiers became paralyzed and could not participate in battle.

Treatment of conversion disorder aims at helping the patient resolve the underlying conflict. Under former classifications, this disorder was called a neurosis (hysterical neurosis, conversion type).

con·ver·sion dis·or·der

1. a mental disorder in which an unconscious emotional conflict is expressed as an alteration or loss of physical functioning, either voluntary motor or sensory.
See also: conversion, somatoform disorder, hysteria. Synonym(s): conversion hysteria neurosis, conversion neurosis, conversion reaction, hysteric neurosis
2. a DSM diagnosis that is established when the specified criteria are met.
See also: conversion, somatoform disorder, hysteria.

conversion disorder

n.
A psychiatric disorder characterized by the presence of symptoms, such as paralysis, tremor, or visual or auditory problems, that resemble those of nervous system dysfunction but cannot be explained by a neurological disorder. Development of the disorder is often associated with psychological stress or trauma. Also called conversion reaction, functional neurological symptom disorder.

conversion disorder

an abnormality in which repressed emotional conflicts are changed into sensory, motor, or visceral symptoms with no underlying organic cause, such as blindness, anesthesia, hypesthesia, hyperesthesia, paresthesia, involuntary muscular movements (for example, tics or tremors), paralysis, aphonia, mutism, hallucinations, catalepsy, choking sensations, and respiratory difficulties. The person who has a conversion disorder may be indifferent to the symptoms yet firmly believes the condition exists. Causal factors include a conscious or unconscious desire to escape from or avoid some unpleasant situation or responsibility or to obtain sympathy or some other secondary gain. Treatment usually consists of psychotherapy. Also called conversion hysteria, conversion reaction, somatoform disorder.

conversion disorder

Histrionic personality disorder, hysteria, hysterical neurosis Psychiatry A group of psychiatric reactions in which the Pt 'converts' mental problems into a physical manifestation, with an inappropriate lack of concern about their disabilities Examples Sensation of a thing stuck in the throat–'globus hystericus', recurrent abdominal pain without physical findings, hysterical blindness, gait defects, paralysis, sensory loss, seizures, urine retention. See 'la Belle indifference. ', Factitious disease, Hysterical neurosis, Post-traumatic stress disorder.

con·ver·sion dis·or·der

(kŏn-vĕr'zhŭn dis-ōr'dĕr)
A mental disorder in which an unconscious emotional conflict is expressed asan alteration or loss of physical functioning, usually controlled by the voluntary nervous system.

conversion disorder

A psychological conflict that manifests itself as an organic dysfunction or physical symptom. Formerly known as HYSTERIA.

Conversion disorder

A somatoform disorder characterized by the transformation of a psychological feeling or impulse into a physical symptom. Conversion disorder was previously called hysterical neurosis, conversion type.
Mentioned in: Somatoform Disorders

Patient discussion about conversion disorder

Q. What are the common caloric conversions? Hi my new friends, help me to find out how does caloric expenditure affect weight loss? What are the common caloric conversions?

A. Hi my new friend. Welcome to this community. I have given here the caloric equivalents for your reference:

1 pound = 3500 kcal
1 gram fat = 9 kcal
1 gram carbohydrate = 4 kcal
1 gram protein = 4 kcal
1 gram alcohol = 7 kcal

Example:
How does caloric expenditure affect weight loss?
An individual creates a caloric deficit by walking one mile to and from work each day. Assuming a 100 calorie per mile caloric expenditure, how many weeks would it take to lose one pound?
1 lb = 3500 calories
2 miles per day x 5 days = 10 miles
10 miles x 100 calories = 1000 calories per week
3,500 calories ÷ 1000 = 3.5 weeks

This information is a fundamental for ACE certifications. Knowledge on this subject is required by our professionals.

Q. While in a conversation with anyone they have about a minute before I loose tract and intrest, Is this ADHD I always feel like I have to go full speed 24/7 and can never relax, sounds strange I know but it seems to be catching up with me.

A. not necessarily...i see that you are 31. those symptoms are new? if so- thee are other conditions that might cause them. hyperthyroid can get you in that state too. so it might be a good idea to go and get checked up.

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