disposition

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disposition

 [dis″po-zĭ´shun]
1. a tendency, either physical or mental, toward a given disease.
2. the prevailing temperament or character, giving a degree of predictability to the response to a situation or other stimulus.
3. the plan for continuing health care of a patient following discharge from a given health care facility.

disposition

Clinical pharmacology The fate of a therapeutic agent after absorption, which corresponds to the sum of its distribution and elimination, including the alpha and beta portions of a declining serum dose
concentration vs time curve. See Distribution Managed careA Pt's destination after discharge from a hospital.

dis·po·si·tion

(dis'pŏ-zish'ŭn)
Follow-up list detailed in the health care record, after the initial episode of care, of services and treatments to be provided to the patient.

disposition

a relatively enduring tendency to behave or respond to situations in a typical way. dispositional adj .

disposition,

n inherent propensity to a particular condition. See also trait, terrain, and constitution.

disposition

setting in place.

disposition curve
the graphic representation of changes in the blood concentration of a drug after administration.
drug disposition
getting a drug into its appropriate position in the body and in an appropriate concentration.
References in classic literature ?
Habit differs from disposition in being more lasting and more firmly established.
The lions, and wolves, and tigers, who will come running to meet you, in front of the palace, were formerly fierce and cruel men, resembling in their disposition the wild beasts whose forms they now rightfully wear.
In everything but disposition they were admirably taught.
The generals seemed to listen reluctantly to the difficult dispositions.
It was growing late, and there was a general disposition to disband.
To take a dislike to a young man, only because he appeared to be of a different disposition from himself, was unworthy the real liberality of mind which she was always used to acknowledge in him; for with all the high opinion of himself, which she had often laid to his charge, she had never before for a moment supposed it could make him unjust to the merit of another.
Cardenio was looking at him steadily, and his mad fit having now come upon him, he had no disposition to go on with his story, nor would Don Quixote have listened to it, so much had what he had heard about Madasima disgusted him.
I married early, and was happy to find in my wife a disposition not uncongenial with my own.
It was a remarkable thing--all that physical strength which had reached in Quasimodo such an extraordinary development, and which was placed by him blindly at the disposition of another.
It shows an evil disposition to take advantage of a friend in distress.
The Alderman, being of a sensitive, retiring disposition, shrank from further comparison, and, strolling to another part of the garden, stole the camel.
He had a brother living near by who was unlike him in respect of all this, and it was a current witticism in the neighborhood that John had inherited his disposition from his uncle.