dislocation

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dislocation

 [dis″lo-ka´shun]
displacement of a bone from a joint; called also luxation. The most common ones involve a finger, thumb, shoulder, or hip; less common are those of the mandible, elbow, or knee. Symptoms include loss of motion, temporary paralysis of the joint, pain, swelling, and sometimes shock. Dislocations are usually caused by a blow or fall, although unusual physical effort may also cause one. A few dislocations, especially of the hip, are congenital, usually from a faulty construction of the joint, and are best treated in infancy with a cast and possibly surgery.

A dislocation should be treated as a fracture when first aid is administered. First aid includes checking for a pulse distal to the location and keeping the patient as still as possible. The patient is moved as a whole unit on a long board or a stretcher. As soon as possible the dislocation must be reduced by a surgeon.
Shoulder dislocation.
complete dislocation one in which the surfaces are entirely separated.
compound dislocation one in which the joint communicates with the outside air through a wound.
congenital dislocation of the hip a former name for developmental dysplasia of the hip.
pathologic dislocation one due to disease of the joint or to paralysis of the muscles.
simple dislocation one in which there is no communication with the air through a wound.

dis·lo·ca·tion

(dis'lō-kā'shŭn),
Displacement of an organ or any part; specifically a disturbance or disarrangement of the normal relation of the bones at a joint in which there is complete loss of contact between the two articular surfaces. The direction of the dislocation is determined by the position of the distal part of the articulation.
Synonym(s): dislocatio, luxation (1)
[L. dislocatio, fr. dis-, apart, + locatio, a placing]

dislocation

/dis·lo·ca·tion/ (dis″lo-ka´shun) displacement of a part.
complete dislocation  one completely separating the surfaces of a joint.
compound dislocation  one in which the joint communicates with the air through a wound.
congenital dislocation of the hip  developmental dysplasia of the hip.
pathologic dislocation  one due to paralysis, synovitis, infection, or other disease.
simple dislocation  one in which there is no communication with the air through a wound.
subspinous dislocation  dislocation of the head of the humerus into the space below the spine of the scapula.

dislocation

(dĭs′lō-kā′shən)
n.
1. The act or process of dislocating or the state of having been dislocated: "the severe emotional dislocation experienced by millions of immigrants ... who were forced to separate themselves forever from the ... circle of people and places on which they had depended" (Doris Kearns Goodwin).
2. Displacement of a body part, especially the temporary displacement of a bone from its normal position.
3. Chemistry An imperfection in the crystal structure of a metal or other solid resulting from an absence of an atom or atoms in one or more layers of a crystal.
4. Geology See displacement.

dislocation

[dis′lōkā′shən]
Etymology: L, dis + locare, to place
the displacement of any part of the body from its normal position, particularly a bone from its normal articulation with a joint. See also incomplete dislocation. dislocate, v.

dislocation

Orthopedics The complete displacement of a joint surfaces. See Acromioclavicular dislocation, Congenital hip dislocation. Cf Subluxation.

dislocation

Separation, especially the disarticulation of the bearing surfaces of a joint with damage to the capsule and to the ligaments that hold the joint together.

Dislocation

Displacement of bones at a joint.
Mentioned in: Wilderness Medicine

dislocation

displacement of the articular surfaces of a joint, so that apposition between them is lost and the bony components no longer form a working joint. The cause can be congenital, spontaneous or traumatic, and dislocation may be recurrent. In sport, dislocations of fingers and the shoulder are the most common, as the result of collision with either an opponent or an object such as the ground or goal post. Replacement in position ('reduction') may be spontaneous but if not, it should be attempted early and only by a skilled operator.

dislocation

; luxation loss of normal bone alignment at a joint, e.g. due to trauma, or congenital ligamentous laxity

dislocation,

n forced separation and misalignment of bones in a joint cavity.

dis·lo·ca·tion

(dis'lō-kā'shŭn)
Displacement of an organ or any part; specifically disturbance or disarrangement of normal relation of bones at a joint in which there is complete loss of contact between two articular surfaces.
Synonym(s): luxation (2) .
[L. dislocatio, fr. dis-, apart, + locatio, a placing]

dislocation,

n the displacement of any part, especially a bone or bony articulation.

dislocation

1. displacement of a bone from a joint. Signs include loss of motion, temporary paralysis of the involved joint, pain and swelling, and sometimes shock. Some dislocations, especially of the hip, are congenital, usually resulting from a faulty construction of the joint.
2. displacement of the lens in the eye. See lens luxation.

complete dislocation
one in which the surfaces are entirely separated.
compound dislocation
one in which the joint communicates with the outside air through a wound.
pathological dislocation
one due to disease of the joint or to paralysis of the muscles.
simple dislocation
one in which there is no communication with the air through a wound.

Patient discussion about dislocation

Q. I have dislocated my shoulder for the 3rd time, what I can do in order to avoid surgery? This is an old injury that keeps coming back. I have been dealing with this unstable shoulder for more than 5 years now. In the past few weeks I've visited 3 different doctors, all said that I can't avoid surgery this time or it with keep on dislocating spontaneously. Even though the docs are thinking that it's a lost cause,I got a really good feeling that I will manage to fix my shoulder 100% with no surgery involved. Is there any known therapy I should try before admitting to my surgery?

A. Here (http://orthopedics.about.com/cs/generalshoulder/a/bankart_2.htm and http://orthopedics.about.com/cs/shouldersurgery/a/dislocation_3.htm) you can find a discussion about your dillema - surgery or not

Q. My neighbor's kid had a lens dislocation due to Marfan's disease. Is this a contagious thing? My neighbor's have a sweet 8 year old boy. he had a lens dislocation due to a connective tissue disease named Marfan (I think that the name). It sounds like a very serious condition. My boy is playing with this kid several hour a week. should I take him to the GP to see that his is not infected with this marfan thing?

A. As in love and war so is in medicine the is no always nor never. It is probably the marfan that caused your neighbor kid the lens dislocation but you can never know for sure.
If you want there is nothing wrong in taking your boy for an annual check of an ophthalmologist.

More discussions about dislocation
References in periodicals archive ?
Essays are grouped into categories covering point defect relaxation and diffusion, dislocation dynamics, grain boundaries, nanocrystaline structures and thin films, phase transformations, amorphous materials, and high and low dampening techniques.
Estimate of Stress in the Channel of Persistent Slip Bands Based on Dislocation Dynamics