disintegrative disorder


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disintegrative disorder

 
a pervasive developmental disorder characterized by marked regression in a variety of skills, including language, social skills or adaptive behavior, play, bowel or bladder control, and motor skills, after at least two, but less than ten, years of apparently normal development.

disintegrative disorder

A personality disorder of children marked by regression in many areas of functioning after at least 2 yr of normal development. Individuals exhibit social, communicative, and behavioral characteristics similar to those of autistic disorder. Also called Heller's syndrome, dementia infantalis, or disintegrative psychosis.
Synonym: childhood disintegrative disorder
References in periodicals archive ?
The DSM-5 will include a section on autism spectrum disorder that includes Asperger's disorder, childhood disintegrative disorder, and pervasive developmental disorder (not otherwise specified).
The five points on the autism spectrum included: autistic disorder, Rett disorder, childhood disintegrative disorder, Asperger's disorder and pervasive developmental disorder-not otherwise specified.
Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD) include autism as well as other disorders that are like autism but do not meet all of the same diagnostic criteria including: Rett's Disorder, Childhood Disintegrative Disorder, Asperger's disorder, and Pervasive Developmental Disorder not otherwise specified (DSM-IV-TR) (American Psychological Association, 2000).
20 for autism spectrum disorder that would incorporate several previously separate diagnoses--including autistic disorder, Asperger's disorder, childhood disintegrative disorder, and pervasive developmental disorder not otherwise specified <http://www.
After an overview of the various disorders, such as autistic disorder, Asperger syndrome, Rett syndrome, childhood disintegrative disorder, and pervasive developmental disorder not otherwise specified, it covers causes and risk factors; symptoms, assessment, identification, diagnosis, and early interventions; associated conditions like communication difficulties, epilepsy, non-verbal learning disability, and genetic disorders; evidence-based behavior, communication, and biomedical interventions; educational guidelines; and living with autism and transitioning to adulthood, including housing and employment.
Autism sometimes referred to as "classical autism" is the most common condition in a group of developmental disorders (Asperger Syndrome, Rett Syndrome, Childhood Disintegrative Disorder, and Pervasive Developmental Disorder) known as the Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD's).
PDDs consist of Autism, Asperger Disorder, and it also includes two rare but very severe types, Rett's Disorder and Childhood Disintegrative Disorder.
A relatively acute onset of loss in social and language skills may prompt one to think about childhood disintegrative disorder (CDD).
ASD also includes: Asperger syndrome, Rett syndrome, childhood disintegrative disorder, and pervasive developmental disorder not otherwise specified.
Autism spectrum disorder consists of five subtypes, which include autism disorder (AD), Asperger's syndrome, Rett's disorder, childhood disintegrative disorder (CDD) and pervasive developmental disorder not otherwise specified (PDD-NOS).
Others include Rett syndrome, Asperger syndrome, and childhood disintegrative disorder.
The most severe ASD is autistic disorder (which often is called simply "autism"); other forms include Asperger syndrome and the much rarer childhood disintegrative disorder.

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