control

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control

 [kon-trōl´]
1. the governing or limitation of certain objects, events, or physical responses.
2. a standard against which experimental observations may be evaluated, as a procedure identical to the experimental procedure except for the absence of the one factor being studied.
3. conscious restraint and regulation of impulses and suppression of instincts and affects.
4. a patient or group differing from the case or treated group under study by lacking the disease or by having a different or absent treatment or regimen. The controls and subjects usually otherwise have certain similarities to allow or enhance comparison between them.
automatic brightness control an automated exposure device used in radiology; it senses light and adjusts itself to produce a predetermined fluoroscopic density.
automatic exposure control a timer by which the exposure of x-ray film is determined by the radiographer but the length of exposure is determined by the equipment.
aversive control in behavior therapy, the use of unpleasant stimuli to change undesirable behavior.
birth control see birth control.
hemorrhage control in the nursing interventions classification, a nursing intervention defined as reduction or elimination of rapid and excessive blood loss.
infection control see infection control.
infection control: intraoperative in the nursing interventions classification, a nursing intervention defined as preventing nosocomial infection in the operating room.
motor control the generation and coordination of movement patterns to produce function; it may either control movements of the body in space or stabilize the body in space. See also postural control.
postural control motor control that stabilizes the body in space by integrating sensory input about body position (somatosensory, visual, and vestibular input) with motor output to coordinate the action of muscles and keep the body's center of mass within its base of support. An important aspect of postural control is the righting reactions. Called also balance.
stimulus control any influence exerted by the environment on behavior.

con·trol

(kon-trōl'),
1. To regulate, restrain, correct, or restore to normal.
2. Ongoing operations or programs aimed at reducing a disease.
3. Members of a comparison group who differ in disease experience or allocation to a regimen from the subjects of a study.
4. In statistics, to adjust or take into account extraneous influences.
5. A necessary aspect of an experiment serving as a standard of comparison. A control differs from other aspects of an experiment by a single variable.
6. The regulation of a biochemical process, system, pathway, or reaction.
[Mediev. L. contrarotulum, a counterroll for checking accounts, fr. L. rotula, dim. of rota, a wheel]

control

/con·trol/ (kon-trōl´)
1. the governing or limitation of certain objects or events.
2. a standard against which experimental observations may be evaluated.
3. the conscious restraint, regulation, or suppression of impulses, instincts, and affects.

aversive control  in behavior therapy, the use of unpleasant stimuli to change undesirable behavior.
birth control  deliberate limitation of childbearing by measures to control fertility and to prevent conception.
motor control  the systematic transmission of impulses from the motor cortex to motor units, resulting in coordinated muscular contractions.
stimulus control  any influence of the environment on behavior.

control

(kən-trōl′)
v.
1. To verify or regulate a scientific experiment by conducting a parallel experiment or by comparing with another standard.
2. To hold in restraint; check.
3. To reduce or prevent the spread of.
n.
1. A standard of comparison for checking or verifying the results of an experiment.
2. An individual or group used as a standard of comparison in a scientific experiment, as a group of subjects given an inactive substance in an experiment testing a new drug administered to another group of subjects.

control

Etymology: Fr, controler, to register
1 v, to exercise restraint or maintain influence over a situation, as in self-control, the conscious limitation or suppression of impulses.
2 n, a standard against which conclusions may be measured, as in a "control group."

control

EBM
noun A comparator against which a therapy in a clinical trial is evaluated—e.g., concurrent controls (placebo, no treatment, dose-response, active) or external controls (historical, published literature and meta-analysis).

The trial protocol incorporates scientific rationale for selecting the comparator and describes how it serves as a reference point for evaluation.

Informatics
noun The processes or operations intended to ensure authenticity, integrity and confidentiality of electronic records.

control

Clinical research Control subject A nontreated or 'negative' individual in a study who serves as a reference. See Concurrent nonrandomized control, Control population, Control subject, Historical control Epidemiology In a case-control study, a comparison group of persons without disease Lab medicine A specimen with known or standardized values for an analyte, that is processed in tandem with an unknown specimen; the 'control' specimen is either known to have the substance being analyzed, ie 'positive' control or known to lack the substance of interest, ie 'negative' control. See Negative control, Positive control, Quality control Psychology The degree to which a person can limit or modify verbal or physical responses to external stimuli. See Administrative control, Impulse control.

con·trol

(kŏn-trōl')
1. (v.) To regulate, restrain, correct, restore to normal.
2. (n.) Ongoing operations or programs aimed at reducing a disease.
3. (n.) Members of a comparison group who differ in disease experience or allocation to a regimen from the subjects of a study.
4. (v). statistics To adjust or take into account extraneous influences.

control

  1. an experiment carried out to afford a standard of comparison for other experiments, e.g. where the effect of a nutrient substance on a plant is being tested, control plants are grown in exactly similar conditions but without the addition of the nutrient substance.
  2. (also calledpara population control) the limitation by man of numbers of harmful plants or animals by artificial means, e.g. spraying with chemicals, poisoning, shooting or by seminatural means such as BIOLOGICAL CONTROL. See also REGULATION (2).
  3. (control system) a system that regulates a chemical process such as thyroxine production. See FEEDBACK MECHANISM.

control

standard against which experimental observations can be compared and evaluated

control,

n 1. power to direct the outcome of events that occur throughout life. To develop effective problem-solving skills and strategies, one must specifically differentiate between the circumstances that can and cannot be personally managed. For instance, one can direct the events associated with a work but not the outcome of a surgery. In behavioral medicine, it is one of the three unique attitudes associated with stress hardiness.
2. comparison standard as part of comparative test design.
3. the group selected for comparison to a test group in order to assess a hypothesis. See also stress hardiness.

con·trol

(kŏn-trōl')
To regulate, restrain, correct, or restore to normal.

control

1. the governing or limitation of certain objects or events.
2. a standard against which experimental observations may be evaluated, as a procedure identical to the experimental procedure except for the one factor being studied; a requirement of any planned experimental study. Also, any individual of the group exhibiting the standard characteristics.

disease control
restraining or reducing the prevalence of individual disease. Includes the range of strategies from limitation of occurrence to eradication. Implies legislative control of notifiable disease.
control elements
nucleotide sequences on DNA that usually precede (upstream) the sequences coding for the structural gene at which regulator proteins act.
control factor
in a comparison between diseases caused by a number of contributing factors it may be necessary to supply controls for one or more of these factors.
control group
the group of animals with which the experimental group is to be matched; the group which has not had its variables manipulated experimentally. The selection of the animals to be included in the two groups may be based on matching them with respect to age, to their history of nutrition or inheritance, or vaccination or prophylactic treatment. Called also controls.
ovulation control
prevention of ovulation by administration of progesterone or stimulation of ovulation by injection of follicle-stimulating hormone are examples.
paired control
comparison between the experimental and control groups is most accurate if the control animal for each experimental animal is selected to be as similar as possible, i.e. a paired control.
control pole
a pole with a noose at the end used to catch and restrain small animals.
control population
a large control group.
population control
a variety of techniques are used with contraception being least used. Permanent surgical interference is common in food, racing and companion animal groups, and termination of pregnancy and estrus synchronization, both by hormonal means, are also extensively practiced. Increasing the culling rate is the standard procedure for dealing with a feed shortage.
x-ray control unit
the controlling mechanisms in an x-ray machine. Include the voltmeter and voltage compensator control, the kilovoltage, milliameter and milliamperage selectors and the timer and exposure control button.

Patient discussion about control

Q. Does it exist a Birth Control Shot for men?

A. No. Currently there are no available medications for birth control for men. However, there are several other methods, including barrier methods (condom) and more irreversible ones (e.g. vasectomy) which may require a treatment by a surgeon.

You may read more here: http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/ency/article/001946.htm

Q. how control premature ejuculation

A. There are medications that can help it, but they're prescription drugs so you may consult your doctor. Apart from that,, since in most cases there's no underlying medical problem that cause the premature ejaculation, you may consider consulting a sex therapist or mental health professional.

Q. BIRTH CONTROL how many types are there?

A. HI doctor-you forgot one--THE CELL PHONE RADIATION,next time you go out on a date dont forget your cell phone and a piece of string.HA HA ---mrfoot56

More discussions about control
References in periodicals archive ?
Major organization : CENTERS FOR DISEASE CONTROL AND PREVENTION (CDC)
Address for correspondence: Nina Marano, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 1600 Clifton Rd NE, Mailstop EO3, Atlanta, GA 30333, USA; email: NMarano@cdc.
Influenza (Flu)/Primary Changes and Updates in the 2005 Recommendations, Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, August 8, 2005.
Atlanta, GA:Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.
Human Influenza: Center for Disease Control & Prevention, www.
Increase in Legionella pneumonia, Philadelphia and surrounding regions, Philadelphia: Division of Disease Control Health Advisory, July 31, 2003.
But one organization, the New York City-based public policy advocacy group, Housing Works, used the Centers for Disease Control data and local New York state statistics to show how a funding disparity toward HIV/AIDS groups was just as much to blame for the high incidence rates in communities of color.
In 1994, the Centers for Disease Control received three reports of E.
NEW YORK, and WASHINGTON, April 20 /PRNewswire/ -- Recent reports from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) reveal that only two-thirds of American children are adequately immunized by age two.
Consequently, the FBI classified three of the seven reported AIDS cases as occupational for statistical purposes, even though the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) believed that sufficient evidence did not exist to prove that the officers contracted the diseases while on the job.
The Centers for Disease Control has asked five state vector-control agencies to collect Asian tiger mosquitoes from their freshwater swamp breeding habitats.
com/research/23xqkl/communicable_disea) has announced the addition of John Wiley and Sons Ltd's new book "Communicable Disease Control and Health Protection Handbook, 3rd Edition" to their offering.