pragmatics

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prag·mat·ics

(prag-mat'iks),
A branch of semiotics; the theory that deals with the relation between signs and their users, both senders and receivers.
[G. pragmatikos, fr. pragma, thing done]

prag·mat·ics

(prag-mat'iks)
1. linguistics The set of rules that govern the use of language in context, including social conventions (e.g., eye contact, accompanying gestures, proximity between speaker and listener, and turn-taking).
2. The effects of social setting and environment on language.
[G. pragmatikos, fr. pragma, thing done]

pragmatics

(prăg-măt′ ĭks)
In speech and language pathology, the social or interpersonal context of language (i.e., knowing how to use spoken language appropriately with other speakers).
References in periodicals archive ?
In this way, the discourse-pragmatic account is an advance over early grammatical accounts (e.
Second, the discourse-pragmatic account is also an improvement over the grammatical topic-drop account (e.
Finally, the discourse-pragmatic account is perhaps complementary to processing accounts (e.
This paper began with the hypothesis that discourse-pragmatic features of informativeness could provide an explanation for the choice of Inuit children aged 2;0-3;6 to omit arguments (verbal cross-referencing affix only) or to represent them overtly (demonstrative or lexical NP).
We also suggest that the discourse-pragmatic account investigated here for Inuit children can be extended to children learning other languages like English in which argument omission is not typically permitted in the target language.
Results based on logistic regression analyses suggest that a discourse-pragmatics account of argument representation has good explanatory adequacy, and that several of the features characterizing informativeness are good indicators of those arguments that tend to be overtly produced rather than omitted in early child language.
Three major types of explanation have been put forth to explain argument ellipsis in child language: grammatical, performance, and discourse-pragmatics accounts.