disaster

(redirected from Disasters)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal, Idioms, Encyclopedia.
Related to Disasters: Natural Disasters

disaster

 [dĭ-zas´ter]
a situation that produces damage and varying amounts of destruction; there is a three-tiered classification for disasters, based on the number of casualties. See also emergency.

disaster

Etymology: L, dis, apart, astrum, a star
any mishap or misfortune that is ruinous, distressing, or calamitous.
Global village A cataclysmic event in which there is a loss of multiple lives and/or major property damage
Nuclear physics Decay disaster
Public health Any unanticipated event that requires urgent response to bring people and/or property out of harm’s way in order to minimise loss of life or destruction of property

disaster

Public health Any unanticipated event that requires urgent response, bringing people and/or property out of harm's way in order to minimize loss of life or destruction of property; disasters are described by certain parameters Vox populi A cataclysmic event in which there is a loss of multiple lives and/or major property damage. See Climatologic disaster, Geological disaster, Man-made disaster, Natural disaster, Tsunami.
Disaster classifications
Nature, ie either
1. Natural, geophysical–eg earthquakes, volcanoes or weather-related–eg floods, hurricanes.
2. Man-made–transportation-related, structural collapse, war, hazardous materials, explosions, fires
Location Single site–eg explosion or multiple sites–eg hurricanes
Predictability Regular–eg hurricane season or sporadic–eg toxic spill
Onset Gradual–eg armed conflict or abrupt–eg accident
Duration Brief–eg natural disaster or extended–eg armed conflict
Frequency Often–eg flood, or rare–eg fire
.

DISASTER

(di-zas'tĕr)
An acronymic paradigm developed by the American Medical Association to assist in organizing the reaction to a mass-casualty incident. The components of the acronym are D for disaster, I for incident command, S for scene security and safety, A for assess hazards, S for support, T for triage and treatment, E for evacuation, and R for recovery.
References in classic literature ?
I had never seen the good old negro look so dispirited, and I feared that some serious disaster had befallen my friend.
These last words were pronounced in a strange tone of menace as though he were supernaturally aware of some suspended disasters.
The causes of superstition are: pleasing and sensual rites and ceremonies; excess of outward and pharisaical holiness; overgreat reverence of traditions, which cannot but load the church; the stratagems of prelates, for their own ambition and lucre; the favoring too much of good intentions, which openeth the gate to conceits and novelties; the taking an aim at divine matters, by human, which cannot but breed mixture of imaginations: and, lastly, barbarous times, especially joined with calamities and disasters.
I tell you it was from perfectly natural mishap; lots of other people besides Pendragons were drowned; and both disasters are discussed in a normal way by navigators.
And please do not suppose that this is so small a matter that we may have a laugh at it and dismiss it; we must be able to foresee our disasters and arm against them.
And she burst into sobs with the despairing vehemence with which people bewail disasters they feel they have themselves occasioned.
Between the disasters that had befallen his master and his master's house, and the Frenchman, Mugambi saw a sinister relationship, which kept him from recalling to Werper's attention the identity which the latter evidently failed to recognize.
When one is told nothing, one fears the worst, and when time after time the news of these small disasters reaches us piecemeal, about three weeks late, we never get rid of our forebodings, even when you tell us about victories.
By a series of sea disasters and delays too interminable to relate, she had made one of those long, unsighted passages such as occur once or twice in half a century.
Her son (of whom I feel truly ashamed to be obliged to speak again so soon) made an effort to extricate his mother--involved himself in a series of pecuniary disasters, which commercial people call, I believe, transactions--struggled for a little while to get out of them in the character of an independent gentleman--failed--and then spiritlessly availed himself of the oleaginous refuge of the soap and candle trade.
He lighted his pipe and pondered over the hieroglyphics found among the ruined cities of Yucatan; I lighted my pipe, and read the only book I could find in the dining-room--a dreadful record of shipwrecks and disasters at sea.
If my memory serves me the disasters which overtook the Majority of this honourable body always befell when it was the Minority's deal.