dissociative identity disorder

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dissociative identity disorder

 
a type of dissociative disorder in which more than one personality exists in the same individual. Each personality has unique memories, characteristic behaviors, and social relationships that determine the individual's actions when that personality is dominant; the various personalities are usually very different from one another and may even seem to be opposites. At least two of the personalities control the patient's behavior in turns, with the transition from one personality to another often being abrupt. The host personality is usually totally unaware of the alternate personalities and experiences only gaps of time when the others are in control as well as inability to recall important personal information. Called also multiple personality disorder

dissociative identity disorder

1. a disorder in which two or more distinct conscious personalities alternately prevail in the same person, sometimes without any one personality being aware of the other(s).
2. a DSM diagnosis that is established when the specified criteria are met.

dissociative identity disorder

dissociative identity disorder

a psychiatric disorder characterized by the existence of two or more distinct, clearly differentiated personality structures within the same individual, any of which may dominate at a particular time. Each personality is a complex unit with separate well-developed emotional and thought processes, behavior patterns, and social relationships. The various subpersonalities are usually dramatically different and may or may not be aware of the existence of the others. Formerly called multiple personality disorder.

dissociative identity disorder

Multiple personality disorder The “presence of 2 or more distinct identities or personality states…that recurrently take control of behavior.” DID is accompanied by an inability to recall important personal information that exceeds ordinary forgetfulness; there are ±20,000 DIDs in the US

dis·so·ci·a·tive i·den·ti·ty dis·or·der

(di-sō'sē-ă-tiv ī-den'ti-tē dis-ōr'dĕr)
A disorder in which two or more distinct conscious personalities alternately prevail in the same person, sometimes without any one personality being aware of the other(s).

Dissociative identity disorder (DID)

Term that replaced Multiple Personality Disorder (MPD). A condition in which two or more distinctive identities or personality states alternate in controlling a person's consciousness and behavior.
References in periodicals archive ?
A third type mistakes the disassociative for the associative; their poems take obliquity itself for the end of poetry.
Written by psychotherapist Rachel Gunner and Disassociative Identity Disorder sufferer Hanna Gabriele, Beyond These Walls: The True Story of a Lost Child's Journey to a Whole Life is the true story of Hanna's struggle with 26 separate personalities that drove her to the point of attempting suicide.
When attempting to understand Islamic terrorism, western scholars tend to gravitate in the direction of a view skewed to pathology: When we think of terrorists, we believe "their minds 'work differently' than ours--when the issue is really one of different values and disassociative techniques.
Another of the most interesting is Disassociative Fugue, sufferers of which change their identity and have no recollection of who they were before.
He includes the background relevant to etiological, diagnostic, and therapeutic considerations for anxiety disorders, disassociative and sleep disorders, somatoform disorders, schizophrenia and delusional disorders, affective disorders and suicide, psychosexual and substance abuse disorders.
In a documentary tradition they engage reality, but their gaze is subjective, disassociative, and theoretically situated in post-colonial situations of diaspora, migration, and ambivalent experiences of nation, borders, and belonging.
They are Active, Passive, and Disassociative, of which the Active and Passive capacities contain sub-layers.
He grows up emotionally disassociative, sexually confused (though mighty gay, Caouette apparently has a son of his own somewhere - but that's another movie) and one highly imaginative drama princess.
You never know when disassociative thinking may produce an inspiration.